Make Two Easy Wabi Sabi-Style Crafts for Your Home

Create this trendy look with upcycled supplies.

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Photo by: Debbie Wolfe

Debbie Wolfe

The Japanese philosophy of embracing imperfection is a top design trend this year.  The Wabi Sabi aesthetic is about seeing beauty as imperfect, impermanent and incomplete. Organic, asymmetrical forms, as well as, warm, natural wood textures are some elements in the style. These two Wabi Sabi-inspired projects are an easy and inexpensive way to add some stylish "imperfection" to your home.

Photo by: Debbie Wolfe

Debbie Wolfe

Kintsugi, or Unbreaking

Kintsugi is the art of repairing broken pottery. The main philosophy of the art is that breakages are part of the history of an object. The history should be highlighted not disguised or the object discarded. Instead of throwing away broken ceramics, Kintsugi highlights and enhances the breaks with powdered gold, silver or platinum. The repaired piece gets a second chance and a splash of bling!

Materials

  • broken ceramics
  • epoxy resin
  • gold enamel paint or mica powder
  • tooth picks
  • paper plate or scrap cardboard

Photo by: Debbie Wolfe

Debbie Wolfe

This technique works best with enamel paint or mica powders. You can even use eyeshadow. 

Photo by: Debbie Wolfe

Debbie Wolfe

Squeeze about an ounce of two-part epoxy resin onto a spare piece of cardboard in a well-ventilated area.

Photo by: Debbie Wolfe

Debbie Wolfe

Add some of the gold enamel paint or mica powder to the epoxy. You do not need much color. Use a toothpick to add a dot of color or two and mix for 60 seconds. 

Photo by: Debbie Wolfe

Debbie Wolfe

Apply the tinted epoxy resin to the ceramic shard. A little goes a long way, so do not use too much.

Photo by: Debbie Wolfe

Debbie Wolfe

Replace the broken shard piece to the body of the broken ceramic. Let some of the epoxy ooze out between the cracks. The epoxy needs to cure for 24 hours. Once it's cured, the epoxy is food safe.

Imperfect Wood Block Shelves

Photo by: Debbie Wolfe

Debbie Wolfe

Show off some of your Kintsugi art on these organic shelves.

Materials

  • wood blocks
  • keyhole hangers
  • paint or stain

Photo by: Debbie Wolfe

Debbie Wolfe

These square blocks were cut from a leftover piece of 4x4. The more cracks and dents in the wood, the better!

Photo by: Debbie Wolfe

Debbie Wolfe

Paint or stain your wood pieces. Find the center of a face of the wood block and center the keyhole hanger.

Photo by: Debbie Wolfe

Debbie Wolfe

Mark the top and bottom of the keyhole hanger. Drill pilot holes where you have marked.

Photo by: Debbie Wolfe

Debbie Wolfe

Place the keyhole screw in the holes and secure the screws in the drill.

Photo by: Debbie Wolfe

Debbie Wolfe

When hanging the blocks, secure them to the wall with drywall anchor or by a flat-headed nail embedded into a stud.

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