DIY Network

Tree Shopping List

Learn about several tree varieties and the planting information for each zone.

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Yaupon Holly (15 of 16)

Full sun to part shade.
Can be trimmed into shapes.
Leaves are dark green and leathery on top, a lighter color on the underside.
Pale bark with gray patches.
Low maintenance.
Will tolerate the heat, wind and even when it gets dry during the summer months.
Grows about 20 feet high and 15 feet wide.
It's good to plant male and female hollies together because the females produce copious amounts of red berries. The berries attract birds during the winter months.
The berries make great holiday decorations.
You can mix one part clear floor wax with two parts water, dip the holly stem in, and your holly will have a beautiful shine throughout the holidays.
Hardy in USDA zones 7-10:
Zone 7: Plant in early spring or early fall; plant in full sun to light shade; mulch in spring to conserve moisture and again in fall; prune only if needed; prune light to moderately during growing season and hard in late winter.
Zone 8: Plant in early fall; plant in full sun to light shade; mulch in spring to conserve moisture and again in fall; prune only if needed; prune light to moderately during growing season and hard in late winter.
Zone 9: Plant in early fall; plant in full sun to partial shade; mulch in spring to conserve moisture and again in fall; prune only if needed; prune light to moderately during growing season and hard in late winter; great for planting in coastal areas subjected to salt spray.
Zone 10: Plant in early fall; plant in full sun to partial shade; mulch in spring to conserve moisture and again in fall; prune only if needed; prune light to moderately during growing season and hard in late winter; great for planting in coastal areas subjected to salt spray.
Native Americans used to make a tea with the leaves of the Yaupon Holly and other plants. The tea was called black tea and caused vomiting. That's how the name vomitoria came about; however, it was not the holly leaves that caused the vomiting. The Native Americans apparently drank the tea in excessive amounts, which like most beverages would cause vomiting.

Next Photo: Daybreak Yoshino Cherry

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