Plant Succulents in Pumpkins for a Modern Fall Tablescape

Add fresh color and life to your fall decorations with succulents planted in tiny pumpkins.

Fall is my absolute favorite time of year. I love the cool, crisp air and the warm and cozy color palettes, and I love pumpkins. I know, I know, I’m not alone. Pumpkins are ubiquitous in fall, to the point that you could almost get tired of them. And I probably would be tired of them if it weren’t for the variety that seems to increase year after year. Pumpkins aren’t just orange anymore — they’re white, green, striped, color-blocked. And there are gourds, too, in a multitude of shapes and sizes. 

Tiny white pumpkins planted with succulents add a modern touch on this table. Pumpkins and gourds in a variety of colors, sizes and shapes give tons of interest, and a few snips of fresh eucalyptus tie the look together on a simple table runner made of dropcloth.

Tiny white pumpkins planted with succulents add a modern touch on this table. Pumpkins and gourds in a variety of colors, sizes and shapes give tons of interest, and a few snips of fresh eucalyptus tie the look together on a simple table runner made of dropcloth.

When imagining a fall display for our dining room table, I knew I wanted to include lots of varieties of pumpkins, and I also wanted to bring in some green plants. Easy-care succulents offered the perfect solution. Check them out here in these little pumpkin planters I created in almost no time.

I found that a young echeveria fits perfectly into a tiny hollowed-out pumpkin. Just carefully cut the top off the pumpkin using a knife. Scoop out the seeds using a spoon. (Save some for roasting if you’d like.) Fill with a little soil (you can probably use some from the pot that the succulent comes in) and place your succulent inside the pumpkin.

Any succulents should do fine, but I also chose a few special plants for the Halloween season. Spiderweb succulents (Sempervivum arachnoideum for you fellow plant geeks) have a freaky-cool look befitting the Halloween season. Natural, web-like structures (called trichomes) protect these plants from potential pests. Check it out.

When I’m ready to remove this tablescape, I’ll replant the succulents in pots using more soil for the long-term growth and health of the plants, and I'll toss the pumpkins in the compost. Enjoy!

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