Natural Sugar Preserving Peach Rosemary Glaze

Honey, peaches and rosemary are a delicious combination in this versatile glaze.

Traditional canning recipes for jams and jellies use copious amounts of sugar. The sugar is necessary in jam and jelly recipes for 3 reasons: to sweeten, to set the preserve and to inhibit the growth of bacteria and mold. However, contrary to popular belief, you do not need as much sugar as many recipes call for to make jams and jellies, and you can even use natural sweeteners in place of processed sugar.

Peach Rosemary Glaze from Naturally Sweet Food In Jars by Marisa McClellan

Peach Rosemary Glaze from Naturally Sweet Food In Jars by Marisa McClellan

Peach and rosemary make an unlikely but delicious paring in this preserve.

Photo by: Debbie Wolfe

Debbie Wolfe

Marisa McClellan is the founder of the popular blog, Food in Jars. Her preserving recipes always strikes a balance in using just enough sugar in order for the recipe to do its work, while still tasting great. In McClellan’s latest preserving cookbook, Naturally Sweet Food in Jars, she explores sugar alternatives in preserving.

Review of Naturally Sweet Food in Jars by Marisa McClellan

Review of Naturally Sweet Food in Jars by Marisa McClellan

In her latest cookbook, Marisa McClellan uses natural sugars for small batch preserving.

Photo by: Debbie Wolfe

Debbie Wolfe

McClellan spent months revamping her small batch preserving recipes with natural sugar substitutions. The results were sucessful and she shares all that hard work in her latest book. The book is divided by the type of sweetener used: honey, maple, agave, coconut sugar, fruit juice and dried fruit. We had the opportunity to test out several of her natural sugar recipes and the results were delicious. The natural sugar beautifully matched each fruit or vegetable and the preserves set perfectly. McClellan's recipe for Peach Rosemary Glaze was one of our favorites. It goes great with pork, chicken or roasted root veggies.

Ingredients for Peach Rosemary Glaze

Ingredients for Peach Rosemary Glaze

Only a few seasonal ingredients are needed to make a tasty glaze.

Photo by: Debbie Wolfe

Debbie Wolfe

Peach Rosemary Glaze

Courtesy of Marisa McClellan from Naturally Sweet Food in Jars

A Soft Skin Peeler Only Removes the Skin of the Peach

A Soft Skin Peeler Only Removes the Skin of the Peach

A soft skin peeler effectively removes the skin from a peach—no blanching needed.

Photo by: Debbie Wolfe

Debbie Wolfe

Ingredients

Add the Chopped Peaches and Lemon Zest to the Pot

Add the Chopped Peaches and Lemon Zest to the Pot

Add the chopped peaches, lemon juice, lemon juice and sugar to a large stock pot.

Photo by: Debbie Wolfe

Debbie Wolfe

  • 4 pounds yellow peaches. peeled, pitted and diced (about 6 cups)
  • 2 cups honey
  • grated zest and juice of 1 lemon
  • 1 tablespoon minced fresh rosemary
  • ½ teaspoon kosher salt
  • 5 half-pint jars
  • water bath canner and canning accessories

How to Peel Peaches

Puree Cooked Peaches with an Immersion Blender

Puree Cooked Peaches with an Immersion Blender

An immersion blender makes quick work of finely incorporating all the ingredients.

Photo by: Debbie Wolfe

Debbie Wolfe

A soft skin peeler makes quick work of removing the skins off peaches. A soft skin peeler is similar to a regular vegetable peeler except it has a serrated blade that will not damage soft fleshed fruits or vegetables. If you do not have one of these tools, you can remove the skins from peaches by blanching them in hot water for a few seconds, then immediately dunking them in an ice water bath.

Add Chopped Rosemary to Peach Puree

Add Chopped Rosemary to Peach Puree

Once the glaze is pureed, add the chopped rosemary to the pot.

Photo by: Debbie Wolfe

Debbie Wolfe

Make the Glaze

Add the Peach Rosemary Glaze to Sterilized Jam Jars

Add the Peach Rosemary Glaze to Sterilized Jam Jars

Funnel the cooked peach rosemary glazed into sterilized jam jars.

Photo by: Debbie Wolfe

Debbie Wolfe

In a large, nonreactive stockpot, combine the peaches, honey and lemon zest and juice. Give the contents of the pot a good stir.

Process Peach Rosemary Glaze in a Hot Water Bath

Process Peach Rosemary Glaze in a Hot Water Bath

Process the jars of peach rosemary glaze in a hot water bath canner for 25 minutes.

Photo by: Debbie Wolfe

Debbie Wolfe

Cook for 15-20 minutes, stirring regularly until the liquid thickens and the peaches soften. Remove the pot from the heat and puree the peaches with an immersion blender.

Stir in the chopped rosemary and salt.

Peach Rosemary Glaze is Perfect on Poultry, Port or Root Vegetables

Peach Rosemary Glaze is Perfect on Poultry, Port or Root Vegetables

Try peach rosemary glazed on roasted root vegetables, pork loin or chicken.

Photo by: Debbie Wolfe

Debbie Wolfe

Funnel the glaze into prepared, sterilized half-pint jars. Leave 1/2 of headspace. Wipe down the rims, and appy the lid and rings.

Process in a boiling water bath for 10 minutes.

Enjoy

Marisa suggests other flavor options as well. She recommends adding fresh thyme and red pepper flakes to the glaze.

Recipe reprinted with permission from Naturally Sweet Food in Jars © 2016 by Marisa McClellan, Running Press, a member of the Perseus Book Group.

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