DIY Bike Rack

Build this simple bike rack to keep all your family's wheels neatly organized.

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On a typical weekday afternoon, there are at least four bikes in our driveway. On the weekends and in the summer, the number of bikes increases when the neighborhood kids drop by to play with our kids. To keep the bikes from overtaking our driveway, we decided to make a simple bike rack that will accomodate our bikes, and have plenty of space for visitors to park their wheels. 

A Place to Park the Bikes

A Place to Park the Bikes

This simple bike rack has enough space to hold everyone in the family's bikes plus there's room for guests.

Photo by: Debbie Wolfe

Debbie Wolfe

Supplies

Wood Bike Rack Supplies

Wood Bike Rack Supplies

This bike rack was made with 2x4's and 4x4's pressure treated wood.

Photo by: Debbie Wolfe

Debbie Wolfe

  • (2) 4x4 6-feet long, pressure treated lumber
  • (15) 2x4 29-inches long, pressure treated lumber 
  • (60) 10d 3-inch galvanized nails, or 3-inch exterior screws
  • drill and bits
  • hammer
  • tape measure
  • speed square
  • paint (optional)

Step 1

Mark the Locations of the Bike Rack

Mark the Locations of the Bike Rack

Beginning at one end, mark the locations for (13) 2x4’s on the 4x4’s. 2x4’s are 3 ⅝ inches wide, and there are two inches between them. I used a scrap of 2x4 to mark the board spaces.

Photo by: Debbie Wolfe

Debbie Wolfe

Lay the 4x4s parallel to and right up against one another with the ends even. In this position the locations for the 2x4s can be marked on both at the same time. Beginning at one end, mark the locations for (13) 2x4s on the 4x4s. 2x4s are 3 ⅝ inches wide, and there are two inches between them. Used a scrap of 2x4 to mark the board spaces. A speed square helps quickly mark the two-inch space and helps to keep the marker block properly aligned.

Step 2

Nail the end 2x4’s in Place

Nail the end 2x4’s in Place

Nail (or screw) the (2) end 2x4’s in place with a single nail (or screw) in each end.

Photo by: Debbie Wolfe

Debbie Wolfe

Position the 4x4s parallel to one another, spaced so that the outer edges are 29 inches apart. Nail (or screw) the (2) end 2x4s in place with a single nail (or screw) in each end. The ends of the 2x4s should be flush with the sides of the 4x4s.

Step 3

Make Sure the Bike Rack Frame is Square

Make Sure the Bike Rack Frame is Square

Square up the assembly. Measure diagonally from the top left corner of one of the 2x4’s to the bottom right of the other; then from the bottom left corner of the first one to the top right of the other.

Photo by: Debbie Wolfe

Debbie Wolfe

Square up the assembly. Measure diagonally from the top left corner of one of the 2x4s to the bottom right of the other; then from the bottom left corner of the first one to the top right of the other. The two measurements should be the same. If not, gently tap the longer end with a hammer to rack it into the proper position When the assembly is square, drive a second nail (or screw) into each end of the 2x4s. Working from one end to the other, and using the pre-marked locations to guide you, attach the remaining (11) 2x4s on the top side by driving two nails (or screws) into each end.

Step 4

 Attach 2x4 to Back Bike Rack

Attach 2x4 to Back Bike Rack

Flip the assembly over. Attach one 2x4 across each end of the bottom, parallel to those on the top.

Photo by: Debbie Wolfe

Debbie Wolfe

Flip the assembly over. Attach one 2x4 across each end of the bottom, parallel to those on the top. Apply a coat of exterior paint.

Park the Bikes

Plenty of Bike Storage Space

Plenty of Bike Storage Space

Each slot in this bike rack will accommodate a wheel.

Photo by: Debbie Wolfe

Debbie Wolfe

Place the rack up against the wall and park your bikes. The best part about this bike rack, is that if you need more space for visitors' bikes, move the rack away from the wall and park the bikes in alternating sides. At least a dozen bikes or scooters can fit in this simple rack. 

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