10 Ways to Use Edible Flowers

Your garden looks good enough to eat.

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Edible flowers are experiencing a renaissance, of sorts. They’re popping up everywhere – on top of wedding cakes, in cocktails and even in savory soups and salads. And not just your usual lavender or nasturtium – pansies, sunflowers, tulips, violets, orchids and even those pesky dandelions are getting the culinary treatment.

Delicious Homemade Treat Pressed Flowers Lollipops

Delicious Homemade Treat Pressed Flowers Lollipops

Gather some edible flowers from the garden and press them to make these tasty lollipops.

Photo by: Debbie Wolfe

Debbie Wolfe

And don’t forget to turn to your vegetable garden, too. The blooms from fruits and veggies and herbs pack a ton of flavor if you’re willing to sacrifice part of your harvest. You can use blooms from bolted herbs and leafy greens, too.

When selecting edible flowers, make sure to select organic plants or seeds. And never consume anything you find growing on the roadside or in the wild. If you need the blooms fast or in bulk, turn to the grocery store, farmers market or online.

Ready to give your next dish a little flower power? Check our top uses for our favorite edible blooms:

Edible Nasturtium in a Summer Salad

Edible Nasturtium in a Summer Salad

Edible nasturtium blooms and leaves can be used in summer salads.

Photo by: Jane Colclasure/P. Allen Smith

Jane Colclasure/P. Allen Smith

Salads
This one’s a no-brainer – toss blooms like nasturtiums, chive blossoms and pansy petals into your next salad for a burst of fragrant flavor.

Fried Squash Blossoms

Fried Squash Blossoms

Fresh yellow squash blossoms are accented with goat cheese and a smoked tomato marinara sauce.

Photo by: Image courtesy of State of Tennessee, Photographic Services

Image courtesy of State of Tennessee, Photographic Services

Fry Them
Up to your arms in squash? Fry up a batch of blossoms (stuffed with cheese, no doubt) when you just can’t eat another piece of zucchini bread.

Hot Tea

Hot Tea

Herbal teas are the focus of the new book Healing Herbal Teas.

©Photography by © Charity Burggraaf, from Healing Herbal Teas.

Photography by © Charity Burggraaf, from Healing Herbal Teas.

Tea
If you’re a tea drinker, you’ve probably had your fair share of florals. Chamomile, rose hips and lavender are common, but also try Echinacea (popular in cold remedy teas), hibiscus and bee balm.

Make Your Own Sore Throat Tea Blend

Take care of that cold with this soothing herbal tea recipe.

Edible Flower Ice Cubes

Edible Flower Ice Cubes

Jazz up your ice cubes by filling ice trays with edible flowers.

Ice
Floral ice cubes are the perfect mix of pretty and flavorful. In beverages, the flowers add a hint of flavor as the ice melts. Try freezing up mint flowers for mojitos, hibiscus flowers for iced tea or make lavender for a botanical take on lemonade.

Photo by: Tomas Espinoza

Tomas Espinoza

Cocktails
Seeing a fresh flower in your cocktail never gets old. But don’t just stop at using them as a garnish – you can infuse your spirits with flowers, too. Vodka is an easy candidate since it doesn’t have much flavor on its own, but don’t be afraid to try infusing gin or even bourbon.

Make Marigold Citrus Popsicles

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Marigold Citrus Popsicles

These popsicles incorporate citrus and marigold petals for a bright, summery treat. Editor’s Note: The content of this article is provided for general informational purposes only. Be cautioned that some plants can be poisonous, and poisonous plants sometimes resemble edible plants which often grow side by side. It is the responsibility of the reader, or the reader’s parent or guardian, to correctly identify and use the edible plants described. HGTV does not guarantee the accuracy of the content provided in this article and is not liable for any injury resulting from use of any information provided.

Gather materials

You will need: 3 cups warm water / 1/4 cup triple sec / 1/4 cup Licor 43 / 3 tablespoons honey (or agave syrup) / 1/2 teaspoon citric acid / pinch of salt / 8-10 medium marigold blossoms / popsicle mold and sticks

Add the honey

Add honey to warm water and gently stir to dissolve.

Add remaining ingredients

Add the triple sec, Licor 43, citric acid and salt to the water and stir to mix completely.

Remove marigold blossoms

Remove the blossoms from the plant and give them a rinse. Shake off any excess moisture. Grab the marigold with one hand at the top of the stem. Use the other hand to gently twist and pull the petals loose all together. Break them apart and discard any pieces you don't want to include.

Place the petals

Drop petals into the popsicle mold loosely fillng it about 1/3 full.

Add water

Pour water slowly into each reservoir of the popsicle mold. Fill almost to the top.

Insert sticks

Place the top on the popsicle mold and insert popsicle sticks.

Finishing Touches

For best results, remove the lid and sticks after one hour. Use long tweezers or one of the sticks to gently push some of the petals down into the liquid. The crystals that have formed will help them stay in place. Replace the lid and sticks and freeze for at least another three hours before serving.

Popsicles
There’s nothing like a homemade popsicle on a hot summer day, and fresh flower petals only add to the experience. We love these boozy, marigold citrus pops – feel free to leave out the alcohol if you’re a non-drinker or have little ones.

Delicious Homemade Treat Pressed Flowers Lollipops

Delicious Homemade Treat Pressed Flowers Lollipops

Gather some edible flowers from the garden and press them to make these tasty lollipops.

Photo by: Debbie Wolfe

Debbie Wolfe

Lollipops
It’s like being a kid again, but fancier. Speaking of kids, this is a great activity to teach them about gardening. Let them help you plant, then harvest, the flowers to make lollipops or candy. Just make sure the kids are out of the kitchen while handling hot sugar.

Strawberry Surprise

Strawberry Surprise

This summer dessert table is a breezy delight in hues of red and pink—with peonies, roses, strawberries and potted herbs arranged by Molly Oliver Flowers.

Photo by: Image courtesy of Molly Oliver Flowers

Image courtesy of Molly Oliver Flowers

Cakes
Don’t get me wrong – I’ve been known to skip the cake altogether and just eat the ornate frosting flowers. But if you’re looking to make a cake stand out, try using the real thing. It’s also a great alternative if you’d prefer to go light on the icing (feel free to send your leftover frosting to me).

Ice Cream Cone Cupcakes

Ice Cream Cone Cupcakes

Cupcakes baked and served in ice cream cones are sure to be crowd pleasers. Gather the following ingredients for this yummy treat: 1 box of cake mix, 1 container of frosting, 24 ice cream cones with flat bottoms and small flowers or other cake garnishes.

Cookies, Donuts and Beyond
You can add edible flowers to pretty much any baked good, but we especially loved them on cookies and donuts. See how it’s done in the video below, plus get more ideas for edible flowers:

Editor's Note: The content of this article is provided for general informational purposes only. Be cautioned that some wild plants can be poisonous, and poisonous plants sometimes resemble edible plants which often grow side by side. It is the responsibility of the reader, or the reader’s parent or guardian, to correctly identify and use the edible plants described. DIY Network does not guarantee the accuracy of the content provided in this article and is not liable for any injury resulting from use of any information provided.

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