How to Keep Your Orchid Happy

Keep that beauty growing! Find out everything you need to know to help potted orchids thrive.
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You don’t forget your first orchid. Mine was a pretty moth orchid with pale pink blooms that floated in mid-air. It survived 18 months, flowered twice and then started to shrivel. I’ve killed every orchid since.

Pink Moth Orchid

Pink Moth Orchid

Moth orchid, also known as Phalaenopsis, is one of the easiest orchids to grow indoors with flowers that last up to 6 weeks.

Photo by: Chicago Botanic Garden at ChicagoBotanic.org

Chicago Botanic Garden at ChicagoBotanic.org

If that’s your experience, take heart. You basically have two options: Marry someone who knows how to grow orchids (that’s what I did) — or focus on fine-tuning your care. Tweak your orchid technique with a few of these easy, practical tips.

Learn When to Water

I killed my orchids with kindness — too much water. This is the No. 1 reason orchids die. When you buy an orchid, it’s usually planted in something like fir bark, stones, charcoal or some other substance that doesn’t hold water. This means you need to water regularly. But you also want the potting medium to almost dry out completely before you water. Sound tricky? It is. The best way to know when to water is to wiggle a fingertip into the potting material and feel for moisture. If your orchid is growing in sphagnum moss, don’t water until the top feels dry.

When you water, make sure water drains freely and runs out the drainage holes. Pour water across the entire surface of the potting medium — but don’t get it onto the plant where the leaves emerge. Last but not least, never let an orchid sit in water.

Get the Light Right

Different orchids need different amounts of light to thrive and flower. In general, an east or west facing window works well. For moth orchids, lower light is ideal, like a spot near an east-facing window. Cattleya orchids, also easy to grow, open into classic corsage blooms. They need more light and can stand direct sun from an east- or west-facing window.

Raise the Humidity

Another secret to growing a gorgeous orchid is high humidity (50 percent or higher). In the wild, orchids grow as epiphytes, perched in tree crotches and absorbing moisture through air roots, those greenish-white stem-looking things that dangle from the pot. Most home environments have humidity around 40 percent, except in winter, when it drops as low as 30 percent. Increase humidity by running a humidifier, grouping plants together or setting pots on a tray of pebbles filled with water to just below the surface of the stones.

Toggle Temperatures

Orchids like temperature differentials — one temperature for daytime and another (usually cooler) at night. Your orchid’s plant tag should state what it needs. To provide a cooler night, shift orchids to an unused bedroom kept on the cool side or closer to a window where you leave the curtains open.

Fertilize Often

Orchids need regular fertilizer. The easiest thing is to use an orchid food that you mix with water, following package directions. Orchid roots are extremely sensitive to over-fertilizing. More is not better when it comes to orchid food.

Encourage Flowers

When orchids bloom, slightly lower daytime temperatures help flowers last longer. On moth orchids, prune the flower spike after blooms die and more flowers will form. Cut the stem just above a node, which looks like a little brown line on the stem. If orchids flower but don’t rebloom the next year and are otherwise healthy, increase light levels.

One of the best resources for orchid growing is the American Orchid Society.

9 Spectacular Orchids

See All Photos

Low's Cymbidium

36 inches tall, 24 inches wide. Ideal growing conditions: bright, indirect light, keep moist in summer, water sparingly in winter.

Photo By: DK - How to Grow Practically Everything © 2010 Dorling Kindersley Limited

Moth orchid

16 inches high, 14 inches wide. Ideal growing conditions: partial shade, allow to dry between waterings.

Photo By: DK - How to Grow Practically Everything © 2010 Dorling Kindersley Limited

The Shining Coelogyne

10 inches high, 12 inches wide. Ideal growing conditions: bright, indirect light, keep moist in summer, water sparingly in winter.

Photo By: DK - How to Grow Practically Everything © 2010 Dorling Kindersley Limited

Doritaenopsis 'Taida Pearl'

28 inches high, 12 inches wide. Ideal growing conditions: bright, indirect light, keep moist in summer, water sparingly in winter.

Photo By: DK - How to Grow Practically Everything © 2010 Dorling Kindersley Limited

Dendrobium 'Sweet Dawn'

24 inches high, 6 inches wide. Ideal growing conditions: bright, indirect light, keep moist in summer, water sparingly in winter.

Photo By: DK - How to Grow Practically Everything © 2010 Dorling Kindersley Limited

Cymbidium 'Minuet'

12 inches high, 18 inches wide. Ideal growing conditions: bright, indirect light, keep moist in summer, water sparingly in winter.

Photo By: DK - How to Grow Practically Everything © 2010 Dorling Kindersley Limited

Callosum orchid (Paphiopedilum hybrid)

12 inches high, 6 inches wide. Ideal growing conditions: partial shade, keep moist in summer, water sparingly in winter.

Photo By: DK - How to Grow Practically Everything © 2010 Dorling Kindersley Limited

Oncidium 'Jungle Monarch'

12 inches high, 12 inches wide. Ideal growing conditions: bright, indirect light, allow to dry out between waterings.

Photo By: DK - How to Grow Practically Everything © 2010 Dorling Kindersley Limited

Epidendrum prismatocarpum

18 inches high, 18 inches wide. Ideal growing conditions: bright, indirect light, allow to dry out between waterings.

Photo By: DK - How to Grow Practically Everything © 2010 Dorling Kindersley Limited

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