All About Power Drills

When deciding which drill to buy, think about how often you intend to use it and what you will use it for. Competition has forced down their cost, making it possible to buy a good piece of equipment for a reasonable price.
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Photo By: DK - Do It Yourself Home Improvement ©2009 Dorling Kindersley Limited

Photo By: DK - Do It Yourself Home Improvement ©2009 Dorling Kindersley Limited

Photo By: DK - Do It Yourself Home Improvement ©2009 Dorling Kindersley Limited

Photo By: DK - Do It Yourself Home Improvement ©2009 Dorling Kindersley Limited

Photo By: DK - Do It Yourself Home Improvement ©2009 Dorling Kindersley Limited

Photo By: DK - Do It Yourself Home Improvement ©2009 Dorling Kindersley Limited

Cordless Drill-Drivers

The most versatile drill, it is both a power drill and screwdriver. It is battery-operated, which makes it highly portable and easy to use. The battery detaches for recharging. The differences between types of drill-drivers are usually indicated by their level of power. The higher the battery's voltage, the more powerful the drill – most are in the range of 9.6 volts to 24 volts. A trigger allows control of the drill's speed. A keyless chuck makes it easy to change out bits. Some drill-drivers also have a hammer action.

Recharging a Cordless Drill

Drills often come with two batteries so that one can be recharging while the other is in use. Press the battery release button to take a battery off a drill. Invert the battery to put it in the charger. Plug in the charger. Recharging may take a few hours, depending on the drill's quality and size.

Maintaining a Drill

Drills need periodic maintenance to ensure that they remain in good working order. Taking drills apart is not recommended, but you should pay some attention to the casing and drill chuck. Unclog vents with a paintbrush to stop dust from damaging the motor or causing overheating. Check the owner's manual for instructions on how best to lubricate the chuck. Check the cord regularly for signs of wear.

Standard Power Drill

Traditional electric drills are sometimes more powerful than cordless drills. A standard corded power drill can perform basic drill functions on a variety of surfaces, depending on its power, but its portability and ease of use are restricted by the power cord. This one has a traditional chuck, meaning that a key is needed to change out drill bits. A switch lock allows continuous drilling without holding trigger.

Lightweight Corded Drill

Fairly powerful drills are now incorporated in a very lightweight body, making them easier to use than older drills. Keyless chucks make changing bits quicker. A small drill such as this can therefore be a good tool kit companion for a cordless drill-driver.

Rotary Hammer

Heavy-duty power drills are usually SDS (special drive system) drills with a chuck that requires a special bit. SDS chuck technology grips the drill bit to support the most efficient hammer action for drilling into very hard masonry. Rotary hammers can be corded or cordless.