Photo Gallery: Paint Effects

Learn how to create faux finishes such as sponging, graining, stenciling and distressing in these photos. The techniques use paint or glaze to create a unique effect.

Photo By: DK - Do It Yourself Home Improvement ©2009 Dorling Kindersley Limited

Photo By: DK - Do It Yourself Home Improvement ©2009 Dorling Kindersley Limited

Photo By: DK - Do It Yourself Home Improvement ©2009 Dorling Kindersley Limited

Photo By: DK - Do It Yourself Home Improvement ©2009 Dorling Kindersley Limited

Photo By: DK - Do It Yourself Home Improvement ©2009 Dorling Kindersley Limited

Photo By: DK - Do It Yourself Home Improvement ©2009 Dorling Kindersley Limited

Photo By: DK - Do It Yourself Home Improvement ©2009 Dorling Kindersley Limited

Photo By: DK - Do It Yourself Home Improvement ©2009 Dorling Kindersley Limited

Photo By: DK - Do It Yourself Home Improvement ©2009 Dorling Kindersley Limited

Stenciling

Attach the stencil to the surface with low-tack painter’s tape. Use a stenciling brush in an up-and-down motion to apply the paint. Remove the stencil carefully. Choose the next stencil location randomly, or create a regular pattern.

Distressing

When using these effects, think carefully where you would expect to find natural wear, such as on the edges of a door, or on the area around a handle. The more layers of different colored paint applied to that area, the greater the effect.

Sponging

A sponge is one of the easiest tools for a paint-effect novice to get to grips with. Build up the finish in layers until you achieve your desired density of color. If different shades of the same color are used, then the final effect will be subtle; if contrasting colors are used then you will get a bolder result.

Sponging

Press a damp sponge into the glaze, and lift it off to leave a mottled impression. Move the sponge across the surface, pressing and removing the sponge in a random fashion. From time to time, rinse out the sponge to remove excess glaze.

Ragging

Press a dampened, crumpled cloth into the glaze randomly across the wall surface. Rinse the rag regularly or have a few replacements ready for when the one you are using becomes too soaked with glaze. Vary the effect by using different types of cloth or even plastic and paper bags.

Rag-rolling

Crumple a rag and form it into a sausage shape, then roll it down the wall surface to create a subtle effect resembling tumbling material. Rinse or change rags often. You can also rag-roll glaze or latex onto a wall for a similar but more dramatic effect.

Stippling

By pressing the very ends of a specially designed stippling brush into the wet glaze, you can create a very finely textured, almost velvet-like finish. Pat the brush into the wall surface in a random pattern and make sure that you go straight up and down with no drag

Dragging

This creates a coarse-lined, textured finish running either vertically or horizontally. Hold a long-bristled dragging brush at a low angle, then draw it in a continuous stroke down or across the glazed surface. This effect can be used on wood as well as walls.

Graining

A wood-grain effect often used on MDF or melamine furniture, graining can be applied to any flat surface. Rock the special graining tool gently as you drag it down the wet glaze surface. Vary the pace of rocking to give different effects.

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