All About Door Hardware

Whether you're installing an entry or interior door, learn all you need to know about the different parts of a door.
RX-DK-DIY156005_passage-latch_s3x4

RX-DK-DIY156005_passage-latch_s3x4

©2007 Dorling Kindersley Limited

2007 Dorling Kindersley Limited

From:

Doors normally require a latch mechanism so that they can be securely closed. Interior doors tend to have a simple mortise catch. The main body of the latch is attached to the closing edge of the door. The catch then engages with a plate that is attached to the door jamb or door frame.

Entry doors and many interior doors may also have door locks for security reasons or just privacy within a home. Common types of door locks include mortise lock sets, cylinder and tubular locks, and unit locks. Cylinder locks are most common in residential use. Deadbolts are used in addition to a standard doorknob lock on entry doors. When selecting door hardware, it is important to know which way the doors swing. Passage latches are used on interior doors where security is not an issue. The latch is opened as the handle is turned.

Once quality and finish have been decided, the number and size of the hinges required relates directly to the weight and function of the door. Interior doors may have two or three hinges. A third hinge, positioned centrally, may be necessary for heavy interior doors. A minimum of three or four hinges are used on entry doors. Large hinges with four or more fastener holes are normally used on entry rather than interior doors. Also, remember that hinges should be oiled after installing (they rarely come ready-oiled). Finally, if a hinge is used on a fire door, make sure that it has the required resistance rating.

When choosing door hardware, ensure that it is in scale with the door itself. Two hinges are usually sufficient for interior doors, but use three or four on entry doors. Entry doors are generally heavier, and call for more durable hardware. Choose locks according to the level of security you require.

Lever Latch Easy to Grip and Open

Lever Latch Easy to Grip and Open

Photo by: DK - Do It Yourself Home Improvement ©2009 Dorling Kindersley Limited

DK - Do It Yourself Home Improvement, 2009 Dorling Kindersley Limited

Latches require a handle that turns, moving the internal mechanism, whereas with catches, a simple pull knob or handle is sufficient.

Levers are easy to grip and open, so are a perfect option for households with children or older adults.

RX-DK-DIY157004_lever-with-lock_s3x4

RX-DK-DIY157004_lever-with-lock_s3x4

©2007 Dorling Kindersley Limited

2007 Dorling Kindersley Limited

This type of decorative latch with a small combined lock is often used for privacy on interior doors. The knob turns to secure lock.

Used on accordion doors, bi-fold doors, and cabinet door fronts, pull handles are easier to grip than knobs.

RX-DK-DIY157006_knob_s3x4

RX-DK-DIY157006_knob_s3x4

©2007 Dorling Kindersley Limited

2007 Dorling Kindersley Limited

Simple doorknobs are used on interior doors, cabinetry, and furniture. Available in a variety of styles and finishes.

Floor Door Stops Cushioned to Prevent Slamming

Floor Door Stops Cushioned to Prevent Slamming

Photo by: DK - Do It Yourself Home Improvement ©2009 Dorling Kindersley Limited

DK - Do It Yourself Home Improvement, 2009 Dorling Kindersley Limited

Hinge Pin Door Stops Limit Movement of Door

Hinge Pin Door Stops Limit Movement of Door

Photo by: DK - Do It Yourself Home Improvement ©2009 Dorling Kindersley Limited

DK - Do It Yourself Home Improvement, 2009 Dorling Kindersley Limited

RX-DK-DIY157010_hinge-door-stop_s3x4

RX-DK-DIY157010_hinge-door-stop_s3x4

©2007 Dorling Kindersley Limited

2007 Dorling Kindersley Limited

In addition to the door stop on the door frame, other door stops can be installed at the bottom of the door to limit the movement of the door or keep the door open.

Floor Door Stop (Image 1)
A floor door stop is cushioned to prevent slamming.

Hinge-Pin Door Stop (Image 2)
A hinge pin door stop is adjustable.

Hinged Door Stop (Image 3)
A hinged door stop attaches to the door.

RX-DK-DIY157012_standard-butt_s3x4

RX-DK-DIY157012_standard-butt_s3x4

©2007 Dorling Kindersley Limited

2007 Dorling Kindersley Limited

RX-DK-DIY157013_rising-butt_s3x4

RX-DK-DIY157013_rising-butt_s3x4

©2007 Dorling Kindersley Limited

2007 Dorling Kindersley Limited

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RX-DK-DIY157014_parliament_s3x4

©2007 Dorling Kindersley Limited

2007 Dorling Kindersley Limited

Doorset Hinge is Specific for a Doorset

Doorset Hinge is Specific for a Doorset

Photo by: DK - Do It Yourself Home Improvement ©2009 Dorling Kindersley Limited

DK - Do It Yourself Home Improvement, 2009 Dorling Kindersley Limited

Strap or T Hinges Used When Extra Support Needed

Strap or T Hinges Used When Extra Support Needed

Photo by: DK - Do It Yourself Home Improvement ©2009 Dorling Kindersley Limited

DK - Do It Yourself Home Improvement, 2009 Dorling Kindersley Limited

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RX-DK-DIY157017_ball-bearing_s3x4

©2007 Dorling Kindersley Limited

2007 Dorling Kindersley Limited

Butt hinges are the most common form of hinge. Good-quality hinges come in brass and stainless steel. Some have extra features such as washers and ball bearings. Oil hinges once they have been installed.

Standard Butt (Image 1)
Has three or four holes on each leaf, and a fixed pin in the hinge barrel.

Rising Butt (Image 2)
Lifts the door upward as it is opened, to allow for a sloping floor.

Parliament (Image 3)
Extended leaf allows a door to open fully, where the frame might otherwise prevent it.

Doorset (Image 4)
Specific hinge for a doorset.

Strap/Tee (Iamge 5)
Used on a ledge-and-brace door, or a door needing extra support.

Ball Bearing (Image 6)
Installed like a butt hinge. Ball bearings give smooth action.

RX-DK-DIY157018_loose-pin_s3x4

RX-DK-DIY157018_loose-pin_s3x4

©2007 Dorling Kindersley Limited

2007 Dorling Kindersley Limited

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RX-DK-DIY157019_flush-hinge_s3x4

©2007 Dorling Kindersley Limited

2007 Dorling Kindersley Limited

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RX-DK-DIY157020_vinyl-hinge_s3x4

©2007 Dorling Kindersley Limited

2007 Dorling Kindersley Limited

Loose pin (Image 1)
The pin allows you to detach the door without removing the hinge.

Flush (Image 2)
Surface-mounted so no need to cut into the door edge to install it.

Vinyl (Image 3)
Specific hinge for a vinyl door.

RX-DK-DIY157022_magnetic-catch_s3x4

RX-DK-DIY157022_magnetic-catch_s3x4

©2007 Dorling Kindersley Limited

2007 Dorling Kindersley Limited

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RX-DK-DIY157023_ball-catch_s3x4

©2007 Dorling Kindersley Limited

2007 Dorling Kindersley Limited

Roller Catch Ideal for Concealed Latch on Cabinets

Roller Catch Ideal for Concealed Latch on Cabinets

Photo by: DK - Do It Yourself Home Improvement ©2009 Dorling Kindersley Limited

DK - Do It Yourself Home Improvement, 2009 Dorling Kindersley Limited

Catches are either screwed directly to the door and door lining, or they may need recessing — as is the case with ball catches, for example. Catches are commonly used on closets.

Magnetic (Image 1)
Often used on glass doors. Made of high-impact plastic.

Ball (Image 2)
Used on closets. The ball pushes into the strike plate.

Roller (Image 3)
A quiet alternative to the clicking sound of a magnetic catch.

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