Small Spaces Can Yield Big Results

You don't have to own a large plot of land to have a garden full of fresh produce. Here are some ideas to get you started.

Photo By: DK - Vegetable Gardening ©2007 Dorling Kindersley Limited

Photo By: DK - Vegetable Gardening ©2007 Dorling Kindersley Limited

Photo By: DK - Vegetable Gardening ©2007 Dorling Kindersley Limited

Photo By: DK - Vegetable Gardening ©2007 Dorling Kindersley Limited

Photo By: DK - Vegetable Gardening ©2007 Dorling Kindersley Limited

Photo By: DK - Vegetable Gardening ©2007 Dorling Kindersley Limited

Photo By: DK - Vegetable Gardening ©2007 Dorling Kindersley Limited

Photo By: DK - Vegetable Gardening ©2007 Dorling Kindersley Limited

Photo By: DK - Vegetable Gardening ©2007 Dorling Kindersley Limited

Photo By: DK - Vegetable Gardening ©2007 Dorling Kindersley Limited

Photo By: DK - Vegetable Gardening ©2007 Dorling Kindersley Limited

Photo By: DK - Vegetable Gardening ©2007 Dorling Kindersley Limited

Vertical Vegetable Gardens

Vertical space is often underused, but it has great potential in small gardens, increasing the space for growing a range of crops. Attaching pots of herbs and bush varieties of vegetables to a sturdy wire mesh can turn a bare sunny wall into a mass of color.

Climbing Vegetables

Climbing vegetables are ideal when garden space is limited because they will produce a big crop from a small patch of soil. In this border, a wigwam of runner beans towers over the dwarf French beans and feathery foliage of carrots. Flowers add a pop of color.

Raised Garden Bed

A sheltered area next to a sunny wall is ideal for growing heat-loving vegetables such as tomatoes, eggplant and peppers. Create a raised bed or position pots at the base of the wall.

Tight, Compact Rows

Where growing space for vegetables is limited, it makes sense to grow crops in tightly packed rows, where as little soil as possible is left bare. Here contrasting foliage from different vegetables look attractive next to each other.

Use Containers

Be imaginative and use containers of all shapes, sizes and finishes. Arrange them in groups to create an exciting and colorful effect. This tiled patio is given a modern feel with metallic containers filled with the bold foliage of exotic greens.

Small Beds Produce Big Bounty

Make the most of a small place by planning crops carefully and squeezing as much variety into the plot as possible. Choose vegetables with interesting colors to add drama to the beds.

Container Crops

Terra-cotta pots filled with good quality potting mix and adequate drainage are excellent for growing selective vegetables on a sunny patio. Colorful crops like chard and red lettuce are easy to grow in pots.

Raised Beds Make Harvesting Easier

Not having to bend down to harvest crops is a big plus to some gardeners. Building a substantial raised bed against a sunny wall or fence means that heat-loving crops such as tomatoes will thrive and require less watering than those growing in pots.

Large Containers for Small Spaces

In a small garden it is important to get the most out of all available space, so choose large containers and fast-growing crops mixed with slower growing crops. Here, red leaf lettuce is planted with zucchini; the neighboring pot shares basil and sweet peppers.

Circular Bed

Planting crops to form decorative patterns is a great way to add interest and not take up too much space. Here a central tree is surrounded by a circular bed of herbs, then concentric rings of salad leaves, carrots, onions and additional herbs.

Narrow Brick Beds

Specially constructed brick beds are ideal for tiny gardens because they look decorative, and even narrow beds can still support useful crops of herbs, salad leaves and root crops if soil is deep enough.

Raised Beds Make Good Use of Space

Raised beds are an efficient way of growing crops. The soil drains well, warms up rapidly in spring and can be tended from the path, avoiding soil compaction.

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