Step 1

Cut Drainage Holes in Base of Growing Bags

2007 Dorling Kindersley Limited DK - Vegetable Gardening

DK - Vegetable Gardening, 2007 Dorling Kindersley Limited

Prep the Growing Bag

Using a knife, carefully cut three openings in the top of the growing bag and cut drainage holes in the base. If using bottomless pots (buy ready-made, or make your own), insert them into the openings and fill with soil.

Step 2

Plant Tomatoes Once Young Plants are Acclimated

2007 Dorling Kindersley Limited DK - Vegetable Gardening

DK - Vegetable Gardening, 2007 Dorling Kindersley Limited

Plant the Tomatoes

When the plants are hardened off and the first flowers are about to open, plant into the bag or the pots so that the top of the root ball is just below the soil surface. Firm the soil around the roots and water well.

Step 3

Pinch Tomato Sideshoots to Increase Production

2007 Dorling Kindersley Limited DK - Vegetable Gardening

DK - Vegetable Gardening, 2007 Dorling Kindersley Limited

Remove the Sideshoots

Add canes or strong wires for support. Take care to pinch out all fast-growing sideshoots between the leaves and stem — they divert valuable energy away from fruit production. Apply a liquid tomato fertilizer weekly.

Step 4

Tie Main Stem of Tomato Plant as It Grows

2007 Dorling Kindersley Limited DK - Vegetable Gardening

DK - Vegetable Gardening, 2007 Dorling Kindersley Limited

Support the Stems

Tie in the main stems with twine as they grow. Stop the plant from growing taller by removing the growing tip, two leaves beyond the fifth or sixth cluster (truss) of fruit. This diverts the plant’s energy into the last fruits of the season.

Step 5

Several Summer Crops Do Well in Growing Bags

2007 Dorling Kindersley Limited DK - Vegetable Gardening

DK - Vegetable Gardening, 2007 Dorling Kindersley Limited

Consider Growing Other Crops

Other summer crops, such as lettuce, suit growing bags, taking only 8-12 weeks from seed to the cropping stage.