Perennial Weeds

You'll want to try to control these weeds that come back year after year.
From: DK - Simple Steps to Success: Vegetable Gardening

Photo By: DK - Vegetable Gardening ©2007 Dorling Kindersley Limited

Photo By: DK - Vegetable Gardening ©2007 Dorling Kindersley Limited

Photo By: DK - Vegetable Gardening ©2007 Dorling Kindersley Limited

Photo By: DK - Vegetable Gardening ©2007 Dorling Kindersley Limited

Photo By: DK - Vegetable Gardening ©2007 Dorling Kindersley Limited

Photo By: DK - Vegetable Gardening ©2007 Dorling Kindersley Limited

Photo By: DK - Vegetable Gardening ©2007 Dorling Kindersley Limited

Photo By: DK - Vegetable Gardening ©2007 Dorling Kindersley Limited

Photo By: DK - Vegetable Gardening ©2007 Dorling Kindersley Limited

Field Bindweed (Convolvulus arvensis)

This climber, with its pretty white flowers and heart-shaped leaves, will regrow from the tiniest fragment of root and quickly spread.

Bramble (Rubus)

A scrambling shrub, with long, arching, prickly stems, that can rapidly become invasive and hard to remove. The stems also re-root at the tips.

Creeping Buttercup (Ranunculus repens)

This low-growing plant with yellow flowers spreads by runners that form a dense mat of shallow roots, which are relatively easy to remove.

Couch Grass (Agropyron repens)

This leafy grass spreads incredibly fast by tough, underground roots that can be hard to dig up intact. It will regrow from any pieces left in the soil.

Dandelion (Taraxacum officinale)

Catch the rosettes of toothed leaves while small and easy to remove—once the taproot grows and the seed disperse, the job is much harder.

Dock (Rumex)

Large pointed leaves and tall flower spikes grow above a fleshy tap root that extends deep into the soil and takes considerable effort to remove once established.

Ground Elder (Aegopodium podagraria)

The creeping roots make this a pernicious garden weed, easily recognized by its elder-like leaves and clouds of white flowers.

Stinging Nettle (Urtica dioica)

The coarse, jagged leaves are covered with stinging hairs. The bright yellow, creeping roots are easy to see, but a challenge to remove.

Horsetail (Equisetum)

Almost impossible to eradicate, the dark brown, bootlace-like roots of these feathery plants can extend several yards underground.

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