Inspiration for Garden-Art Birdhouses

Find inspiration for DIY birdhouses you can make from found and salvaged objects, and learn how to attract birds to your garden.
By: Michelle Reynolds and Bob Farley

Photo By: Bob Farley/f8FPhoto, Bob Farley

Photo By: Bob Farley

Photo By: Bob Farley

Photo By: Bob Farley

Photo By: Bob Farley

Photo By: Bob Farley/f8FPhoto, Bob Farley

Photo By: Bob Farley/f8FPhoto, Bob Farley

Photo By: Bob Farley/f8FPhoto, Bob Farley

Photo By: Bob Farley/f8FPhoto, Bob Farley

Photo By: Bob Farley

Photo By: Bob Farley

Found-Object Birdhouse

A layered woodland of leaf litter, native plants and trees provides habitat for birds. They can dine on worms, caterpillars and insects here in one spot and have their babies here as well.

Bird Hotel

This birdhouse is more like a hotel, with two rooms in front and two in the back. Metal-roofed houses should go in spots where they will receive some shade during the day so as not to heat up too much.

Cedar Plank and Molding Birdhouse

A good spot to install a found-object birdhouse is near a trellised vine. Two elements of the four bird habitat requirements are taken care of here with a place to hide and a place to rear young. Just add food and water.

Bluebird Babies in a Claypot House

Bluebirds will have several broods in a season with a clutch size of two to seven each time. The nest is tight before the babies finally fledge, or develop the ability to fly.

A Fledgling Bluebird

Both parents share responsibilities in raising their young. Daddy bird coaxes this last baby bird out of the bluebird nesting box.

Salvaged Wood and Metal Birdhouse

A metal platform is built onto this birdhouse for occasional feeding. Meal worms would make a tasty treat for bluebirds.

Bird Treehouse

This treehouse stands on a cedar post full of native vines. Passionvine for gulf fritillaries and pipevine for pipevine swallowtails are not in conflict here, as birds find the colorful caterpillars distasteful.

Dovecote Design

What's for supper? A dovecote or pigeonaire was once used to house doves and pigeons for eating. This dovecote stands center court in a hydrangea garden.

Gourd House

Gourds are commonly used for housing purple martins. Purple martins don't mind living, roosting or nesting in colonies, and they will help keep mosquitoes in check if you are lucky enough to attract them.

Birdhouse Garden Art

A bird nest and birdhouse garden art piece provides charm in this setting, and it just might also attract a wren or two.

Bird Habitat Garden

A fence for vines, a bed for native plants, and a plot for a birdbath and bird feeder, when complete, will be the perfect bird habitat garden.

Glass House

The old lamp post was left for years in hopes that a bird would find it suitable for a nest. Finally, a cardinal couple took up residence and had three babies.

Wren House

Wrens will nest anywhere! Leave your truck in the driveway too long without driving and a wren will set up house. Behind a piece of driftwood on a shelving unit, a wren couple raised five little ones.

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