Step 1

When naturalized, bulbs create a spectacular splash of color on the lawn. Most bulbs, including daffodils and bluebells, bloom in the springtime, but with careful planning you can grow flowers in the lawn all year round.

Step 2

Materials needed:

flower bulbs
bulb planter
grit or sand
lawn mower

Step 3

Use Bulb Planter to Take Out Core of Soil

Photo By: DK - Simple Steps to Success: Lawns and Groundcover ©2012 Dorling Kindersley Limited

DK - Simple Steps to Success: Lawns and Groundcover, 2012 Dorling Kindersley Limited

Make the planting look natural.

Do this by scattering the bulbs across the lawn, and plant them where they land. Use a bulb planter to take out a core of soil; bulbs should be planted at two to three times their depth.

Step 4

Plant Bulb and Replace Plug of Turf

Photo By: DK - Simple Steps to Success: Lawns and Groundcover ©2012 Dorling Kindersley Limited

DK - Simple Steps to Success: Lawns and Groundcover, 2012 Dorling Kindersley Limited

Place the bulb in the bottom of the hole.

Keep the growing tip facing upward. If the soil is poorly drained, grit or sand can be added. After planting, backfill the hole with soil and replace the plug of turf.

Step 5

Deadhead Flowers After Blooming in Yard

Photo By: DK - Simple Steps to Success: Lawns and Groundcover ©2012 Dorling Kindersley Limited

DK - Simple Steps to Success: Lawns and Groundcover, 2012 Dorling Kindersley Limited

Wait for the plant to flower.

After it blooms, the plant should be deadheaded, then left for a few weeks until the foliage has died back, allowing nutrients to return to the bulb. Then, mow the faded foliage, and give the lawn a light rolling to level it.