Growing Red Radishes

The red radish is a garden classic: early to sprout in spring, fast to mature, delicious and nutritious. The greens are good too.

Photo by: Sue Ding

Sue Ding

By: Nan Chase

Botanical Name: Raphanus sativus 

Red radishes come in a variety of shapes, sizes, and shades. What they all have in common is a fast growth habit and a strong tendency to grow best in the cool soil of early spring and early fall. Taken together, these red radishes are also known as table radishes, and they are famous for their spicy flavor, crisp texture, and white inner flesh.

Other radish types – large white Asian radishes, black radishes, some icicle radishes – have more tolerance for heat and therefore a long-season growing.

Some of the most popular red radishes for the home garden include:

  • Scarlet Globe or Early Scarlet Globe. As the name suggests, this is a very early radish to sow in the ground and does well in sandy soil. Enjoy the deep red skin and uniform round roots.
  • Sparkler. An attractive radish with a red top and sometimes a white tip. This early radish can have a nice sweet flavor if conditions are right.
  • Cherry Belle. Bearing robust round roots, this variety tolerates warmer growing conditions than many other radishes.
  • Rover Hybrid. This reliable radish is another exception to the “no heat” tendency, and can grow into the summer without becoming tough.
  • German Giant. Wow, it’s big. This red radish can grow as big as a baseball, and if it gets enough water through the growing season will remain tender, not pithy.
  • Saxa 2. A super-early variety, this bright red radish can mature in as few as 18 days. With succession planting that means a steady supply much of the year.

To grow red radishes, check the seed packet for the suggested planting date. Prepare a bed of well-worked soil with lots of organic material – not too much clay – and mark the calendar to plant a portion of the seeds every week or two, in order to have a steady supply of radishes overa long period of time.

Sow seeds directly into the soil, from ¼ inch to ½ inch deep and about half an inch apart, depending on the variety. Cover the seeds with soil, tamp gently, and then water lightly with aspray rather than a harsh stream of water.

Tiny sprouts should appear within five days. Once the new radishes have put on their first fewsets of true leaves (not the first sprouting leaves), it’s time to thin them. The height will be about two inches. Pulling out some of the new sprouts will allow the remaining radishes to grow plump without crowding.

Don’t wait too long to harvest red radishes. Once they reach an inch in diameter it is time to start pulling them up. Rinse, cut off the green tops, and eat.

The greens, if not too full of holes from insects, may be steamed or braised for a delicious side dish.

Keep Reading

Next Up

Growing Forage Radishes

Using huge radishes to break apart compacted soil without plowing? That’s amazing, and that’s the new forage radish method.

Growing Heirloom Radishes

An ancient food crop, radishes have appeared in many forms over the centuries. It’s fun to learn about heirloom varieties.

Growing Radishes Indoors

If your outdoor space is limited, learn how to grow radishes indoors.

Growing Tillage Radishes

New research continues to support using certain radish types to condition fields during winter, after cash crops are harvested.

Growing Purple Radishes

Purple radishes have bold flavor, rich color, and greens that beg to be used. Include them in any sunny, well-watered vegetable garden.

Growing Pink Radishes

Radishes come in a rainbow of colors, from white to black, with all shades of pink and red in between. Meet some of the best.

Growing Black Radishes

Gaining gourmet popularity, black radishes have notable looks and flavor. And they keep well for winter storage.

Growing Organic Radishes

Radishes grown organically serve up helpings of high-fiber, high-flavor food. With care the harvest lasts much of the year.

Growing White Radishes

White radishes come in two distinct types: early, quick-grow white, and long-season slow-growing white. Both are great.

Growing Icicle Radishes

Looking to keep your cool in summer? Try heat-resistant icicle radishes, known for their ability to thrive in many garden conditions.

On TV

I Want That

7am | 6c

Renovate to Rent

7:30am | 6:30c

Rehab Addict

8:30am | 7:30c

Rehab Addict

9:30am | 8:30c

Rehab Addict

10am | 9c

Rehab Addict

10:30am | 9:30c

Rehab Addict

11am | 10c

Rehab Addict

11:30am | 10:30c

Rehab Addict

12pm | 11c

Rehab Addict

12:30pm | 11:30c

Tiny Paradise

7:30pm | 6:30c
On Tonight
On Tonight

Tiny Paradise

8pm | 7c

Tiny Paradise

8:30pm | 7:30c

Tiny Paradise

9:30pm | 8:30c

Containables

10pm | 9c

Containables

10:30pm | 9:30c

Bus Life Ever

11pm | 10c

Tiny Paradise

12am | 11c

Tiny Paradise

12:30am | 11:30c

Containables

1am | 12c

Containables

1:30am | 12:30c

Tiny Paradise

3:30am | 2:30c

Get Social With Us

We love to DIY. You love to DIY. Let's get together.

Consult Our A-Z Guide

Everything You Need to Know

Browse a full list of topics found on the site, from accessories to mudrooms to wreaths.  

How-To Advice and Videos

Get video instructions about kitchens, bathrooms, remodeling, flooring, painting and more.

Watch DIY Downloads Now

Watch DIY Network LIVE

Don't miss your favorite shows in real time online.