Growing Easter Egg Radishes

A mix of seeds from different color radishes – that’s Easter Egg. Enjoy the visual appeal and the longer growing season.

Photo by: Keith Szafranski

Keith Szafranski

By: Nan Chase

Botanical Name: Raphanus sativus

It’s a party! A radish party, that is, when you plant either the Easter Egg radish mix or EasterEgg II mix.

There’s no other choice of radish seeds that can bring as much interest and enjoyment as the Easter Egg types. That’s because Easter Egg isn’t just one kind of radish but many: a mixture of round, white-fleshed radishes: white, pink, red, purple, and lavender varieties.

By mixing many different radish varieties into one package – and these mixes go back generations – the gardener gets the best of all of them. Because the Easter Egg mixes include so many varieties together, gardeners get also get a mix of days to maturity. So rather than having possibly too many radishes get ripe at once – which often means unfortunate garden waste – gardeners can plant the seeds all at one time and yet have the harvest staggered over some weeks.

Easter Egg and Easter Egg II mixes delight children, because the crop comes out in a rainbow of color. Growing Easter Egg radishes may be just the right way to get kids to eat some super-healthy vegetables and have fun at the same time.

For cooks who like a fresh and colorful relish tray to share at social gatherings, Easter Egg is the way to go. The flesh of all these radishes is crisp and juicy, not too hot but with a definite tang.

These radishes generally grow to about one inch in diameter, and radishes should be harvested as soon as they reach this size so they don’t get tough or bitter. In general the radishes grow to maturity in about 28 days. Plant one staggered crop in the early spring and harvest before summer’s heat arrives.

Then plant another staggered crop in late summer, and enjoy the multi-colored treats until the first frosts arrive.

How to plant? Radishes should always be sown directly into the soil, rather than being started indoors and transplanted.

They require lots of sun and lots of water, the water evenly applied throughout the growing season so that roots develop into plump and delicious vegetables; uneven moisture can result in cracking. And of course the green tops are edible too, usually steamed as a side dish or added to soups and stews.

Radishes prefer soil that is well-worked with lots of organic material, and free of stones or
clumps of clay. That way the roots don’t have to bend and twist to find nutrients, and instead become shapely and tender.

Easter Egg and Easter Egg II – depending on exactly the seed mix – are a great way to get started with growing radishes.

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