Give Your Plants a Lift With a Plant Stand

Grow everything from begonias to bromeliads on these pretty and practical stands.

Lowe's Garden Teasures Red Steel Plant Stand

Lowe's Garden Teasures Red Steel Plant Stand

An attractive stand can double as a side table when it's not displaying a plant.

Photo by: Lowe's

Lowe's

An attractive stand can double as a side table when it's not displaying a plant.

If your potted plants are bunched together in a corner of your room or deck, it’s time to let them stand out. You can’t appreciate their beauty when the spider plants get tangled in the ferns and the ivy wanders all over the floor. 

It’s also more visually pleasing to see your flowers and greenery at different heights, or to simply show off special plants on decorative pieces. Choose an ornamental stand or go for one that's both useful and practical, with features like grow lights and space-saving tiers. This red steel stand has a rust-resistant finish, so it can be used indoors or out.  

How to Display Your Plants Artfully

Turn a sunroom or porch into a mini-forest by arranging green foliage plants on stands in corners, behind sofas and beside chairs. Use short stands to display small ferns on tabletops.

If you're grouping a variety of plants together, avoid a cluttered, chaotic look by using stands of the same style, but different heights or sizes. You may be able to mix colors or finishes, too, as long as the arrangement looks unified. All of these nesting stands feature identical twig-shaped legs and crosspieces, antique bronze finish, and tempered glass tops. 

Nesting Plant Stand Bathroom

Nesting Plant Stand Bathroom

Nesting stands can be pushed together for storage when they're not in use.

Photo by: Gardeners Supply Company

Gardeners Supply Company

Nesting stands can be pushed together for storage when they're not in use.

In general, tall plants look better on the lower tier of multi-tiered stands. Arrange shorter plants on the next tier, and the shortest plants, or trailing ones, on the top. The same rule of thumb goes for plant stands that have steps, rather than tiers.

To keep plants in rooms that don't get enough sun, choose a stand with built-in grow lights

Coltura LED Grow Frame

Coltura LED Grow Frame

Plant stands with LED lights are great for potted herbs or seedlings. A magnetic, adjustable shelf lets you move it up for taller plants.

Photo by: Gardeners Supply Company

Gardeners Supply Company

Plant stands with LED lights are great for potted herbs or seedlings. A magnetic, adjustable shelf lets you move it up for taller plants.

Brighten your front door with a multi-level plant stand designed for outdoor use. If you don't have enough greenery to fill it up, add some vintage gardening tools or interesting pots.

Use stands with multiple shelves to display a lot of plants in a small space.  Some are adjustable, so you can move the shelves when the plants get taller.  An A-frame stand also offers plenty of display room, although it takes up a little floor space. 

 A-Frame Plant Stand

A-Frame Plant Stand

Multi-level plant stands save space.

Photo by: Gardeners Supply Company

Gardeners Supply Company

Keep saucers or trays under indoor stands to protect your floor from drips, or slip potted plants into larger cache pots. 

Make Your Own Plant Stands

If you're a DIY-er,  be creative and re-use or repurpose items you already have around the house. 

  • Turn a galvanized wire tomato cage into a stand by spray-painting it to match your décor. If you dislike painting, start with powder-coated, steel wire cages instead; you can find them in green, red, yellow, orange and other colors. Turn the cage upside down, so it sits on the biggest ring, and cut off the wire legs. Put a plant in the top ring, and you're done. 
  • Sit a plant on top of an old footstool or child’s step stool.  Don't have one? Shop a thrift store or yard sale.
  • Make your own A-frame stand from a wooden ladder with three or four rungs. Cut boards to slide from one side of the ladder to the other, so they rest on opposite rungs. They should extend just a few inches beyond the rungs. Then arrange your plants as you like. 
  • Turn a utility cart with wheels, like the kind you’d use in a laundry room or kitchen pantry, into a portable plant stand. These carts usually come with three wire tiers, so again, don't forget to use trays or saucers to catch drips when you water.  
  • For an outdoor planter, turn a wooden crate upside down and rest it on top of some bricks or upside-down terracotta pots. They'll act as legs, so moisture from the ground doesn't make the wood rot. Plants can sit on top of the crate.
  • If you have more than one crate, turn all of them on their sides. Again, rest them on bricks or pots to hold them slightly off the ground, and stack the crates two or three levels high. Place your plants inside the crates.
  • Paint two or three old wooden chairs as desired. Line them up on a covered porch or deck to shield them from the weather, and lay a board across all three seats to hold your plants. 
  • Turn a resin pillar from a home decor store into a pedestal for a specimen plant.
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