Eight Types of Wildflower Plants

Learn more about the wide variety of plants that can be used to grow a meadow flower garden.
From: DK - Simple Steps to Success: Lawns and Groundcover

Photo By: DK - Simple Steps to Success: Lawns and Groundcover ©2012 Dorling Kindersley Limited

Photo By: DK - Simple Steps to Success: Lawns and Groundcover ©2012 Dorling Kindersley Limited

Photo By: DK - Simple Steps to Success: Lawns and Groundcover ©2012 Dorling Kindersley Limited

Photo By: DK - Simple Steps to Success: Lawns and Groundcover ©2012 Dorling Kindersley Limited

Photo By: DK - Simple Steps to Success: Lawns and Groundcover ©2012 Dorling Kindersley Limited

Photo By: DK - Simple Steps to Success: Lawns and Groundcover ©2012 Dorling Kindersley Limited

Photo By: DK - Simple Steps to Success: Lawns and Groundcover ©2012 Dorling Kindersley Limited

Photo By: DK - Simple Steps to Success: Lawns and Groundcover ©2012 Dorling Kindersley Limited

Fox and Cubs Often Used in Meadow Flower Mix

A wide range of plants can be used to create a wildflower meadow. Other than the examples given here, plants to try include grasses such as Cynosurus cristatus (crested dog's tail), Deschampsia cespitosa (tufted hair grass), and Agrostis capillaris (common bent). Bulbs such as bluebells, grape hyacinths, and crocuses in spring, camassias in summer, and colchicums in fall will give attractive year-round color.

Pilosella aurantiaca (fox and cubs)

Knautia arvensis (field scabiosa)

Geranium pratense (meadow cranesbill)

Primula veris (cowslip)

Silene dioica (red campion)

Leucanthemum vulgare (ox-eye daisy)

Prunella vulgaris (self heal)

Achillea millefolium (yarrow)