Common Garden Pests

Some wildlife can greatly benefit your garden; others may cause some harm. Be on the lookout for these bad guys.
From: DK - Simple Steps to Success: Vegetable Gardening

Photo By: DK - Vegetable Gardening ©2007 Dorling Kindersley Limited

Photo By: DK - Vegetable Gardening ©2007 Dorling Kindersley Limited

Photo By: DK - Vegetable Gardening ©2007 Dorling Kindersley Limited

Photo By: DK - Vegetable Gardening ©2007 Dorling Kindersley Limited

Photo By: DK - Vegetable Gardening ©2007 Dorling Kindersley Limited

Photo By: DK - Vegetable Gardening ©2007 Dorling Kindersley Limited

Photo By: DK - Vegetable Gardening ©2007 Dorling Kindersley Limited

Photo By: DK - Vegetable Gardening ©2007 Dorling Kindersley Limited

Aphids

Sap-sucking insects (greenflies, blackflies) weaken growth and carry diseases. Encourage birds and insect predators, pick off small groups, or use a suitable insecticide.

Rabbits

Keep these voracious vegetable eaters out of the garden with a small-meshed fence that extends 1 foot underground to prevent them from burrowing in.

Carrot Flies

Cover crops with horticultural fleece, sow carefully to reduce the need for thinning, or grow resistant varieties to prevent carrot fly larvae from tunneling into roots.

Potato Cyst Eelworm

These microscopic, sap-sucking nematodes cause potato leaves to discolor and die. Avoid replanting the same crop where an infestation has occurred.

Caterpillars

Different parts of various plants may be damaged by caterpillars. Pea moth caterpillars live inside the pods. Net crops to exclude egg-laying adults.

Flea Beetles

These tiny black beetles eat round holes in the leaves of brassicas, turnip, radish and arugula. Keep them at bay by covering seedlings with horticultural fleece.

Red Spider Mites

Small mites cause mottling on leaves, particularly in the greenhouse. Mist plants to increase humidity, and use a predatory mite Phytoseiulus persimilis.

Slugs and Snails

Protect vulnerable plants, and try beer traps and flashlight hunts. Nematode biological controls are less harmful to other animals than slug pellets.