Annual and Biennial Weeds

Take a look at these annual and biennial weeds and learn how to take care of your garden.
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Photo By: DK - Vegetable Gardening ©2007 Dorling Kindersley Limited

Photo By: DK - Vegetable Gardening ©2007 Dorling Kindersley Limited

Photo By: DK - Vegetable Gardening ©2007 Dorling Kindersley Limited

Photo By: DK - Vegetable Gardening ©2007 Dorling Kindersley Limited

Photo By: DK - Vegetable Gardening ©2007 Dorling Kindersley Limited

Photo By: DK - Vegetable Gardening ©2007 Dorling Kindersley Limited

Photo By: DK - Vegetable Gardening ©2007 Dorling Kindersley Limited

Photo By: DK - Vegetable Gardening ©2007 Dorling Kindersley Limited

Photo By: DK - Vegetable Gardening ©2007 Dorling Kindersley Limited

Annual Meadowgrass (Poa annua)

This insignificant-looking, low-growing grass colonizes any available space, including cracks in paving, so remove it before it sets seed.

Ragwort (Senecio jacobaea)

The yellow daisy flowers of this tall plant are produced in its second year, followed by fluffy white seeds that colonize open ground.

Common Chickweed (Stellaria media)

Rather delicate, with charming little white, star-like flowers, this weed establishes and sets seed rapidly, and its sprawling habit smothers seedlings.

Groundsel (Senecio vulgaris)

The white fluffy seeds of this weed float on the breeze, so it can spread far and wide. Remove plants before the tiny yellow flowers mature.

Shepherd's Purse (Capsella-bursa pastoris)

A rosette of cut-edged leaves gives rise to a spike of small white flowers, which quickly form heart-shaped seed capsules.

Hairy Bittercress (Cardamine hirsuta)

Best pulled up as a seedling, when it has small, watercress-like leaves, because the flower stem rapidly forms long seed pods.

Cleavers (Galium aparine)

This scrambling weed is covered with little hooked bristles that enable it to climb through plants. Uproot it rather than pulling the stems.

Fat Hen (Chenopodium album)

The gray-green, diamond-shaped leaves of this common weed are easily recognized. It quickly grows tall, with a loose flower spike at its tip.

Plantain (Plantago)

Low-growing rosettes of almost leathery leaves turn up in beds, paving, and lawns. Remove them before the little bottlebrush flowers are produced.