DIY Network

How to Rough-In a Wet Bar

A wet bar adds style and class to your home. Learn how to get the plumbing ready for a new wet bar.

More in Kitchen

  • Time

    Weekend

  • Price Range

    $250 - $500

  • Difficulty

    Moderate to Hard

Highlights:

Step 1: Check Out the Crawlspace

Go into the crawlspace under the house and find the area underneath the proposed wet bar. Pull away the insulation and mark this spot on the underside of the floor so it will be easy to find again later.

Tip: Karl followed the ductwork under the house to find the right spot on the underside of the floor. It can be helpful to have someone inside the house knock on the floor at the right spot to help pinpoint the area.

Step 2: Get Help From A Pro

Have a professional tap into the home's hot and cold water lines underneath the house. For this project, Karl (a licensed contractor), replaced straight pipe connectors with special T connectors that include shutoff valves. These connectors are designed to work with the easy-connect flexible tubing used in this project.

Step 3: Run Flexible Water Lines

Attach flexible tubing to the T-connectors and run the tubes to the marked location for the wet bar. Karl used red tubing for the hot water and blue for cold.

Step 4: Check Location and Drill

Double-check the location for the wet bar and drill three pilot holes up through the floor — one for the two water lines, and one for a drain line. It's important to drill up from below to avoid hitting any water or electrical lines hidden under the floor; drill pilot holes instead of full-size holes to avoid damaging the floor above.

Step 5: Drill Down From Above

Up inside the house, use hole saw to drill through the floor for the drain line, using the pilot hole as a guide. Use a spade bit to drill through the pilot holes for the water lines.

Step 6: Run The Lines

Back in the crawlspace, run the red and blue tubing up through the holes. Head back up to the room and pull the tubing up through the floor.

Step 7: Install Drain Pipe

Have a professional plumber install the drain pipe, connect it to the household drainage system and install a removable cap on the pipe. The cap will prevent sewer gases from entering the house

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