DIY Network

How to Restore a Fountain Statue

Ed Del Grande gives step-by-step instructions on how to restore a fountain statue to its former glory.

More in Plumbing

Step 1: Turn off the Pool Pump; Cut the Line

Start by shutting off the pool pump at the breaker and closing any valves that allow water to run through the pump.

Measure the pressure tee and mark this area on the line into which you will be tapping. Use a PVC saw to cut into the line; allow any remaining water to drain out.

After cutting the remainder of the pipe, use the pressure tee to mark the area to be removed; then cut this portion out of the line.

Step 2: Apply Adhesives

Apply PVC primer and glue to the pressure tee and threaded bushing. Attach the bushing to the tee and firmly connect it to the water line

Wrap a generous amount of Teflon tape around both ends of two brass nipples; then screw them firmly into the ends of the threaded 90.

Step 3: Attach the Isolation Valve

Screw this fitting into the threaded PVC bushing, tighten with an adjustable wrench and attach the isolation valve.

Turn the isolation valve off. Turn the pump on at the breaker and open all the valves.

Step 4: Attach Fittings to the Isolation Valve

Connect another nipple and the 1/2" x 3/8" transition fitting, and plug to the brass tee. Use plenty of Teflon tape and tighten it firmly

Attach these fittings to the isolation valve and tighten them down.

Step 5: Run the Water Line

Since the isolation valve is tapped in by the pool pump, now run the water line. To do this, insert the 3/8" copper line through an existing hole near the pump in the pump house and pull enough line through to connect to the 3/8" compression fitting.

Step 6: Attach the Nut and Ferrule to the Copper Line

Remove the nut and ferrule from the 3/8" fitting. Slide them onto the copper line and screw them together. Secure the connection with adjustable wrenches.

Carefully uncoil the copper line to the fountain and use quick ties to secure it in place.

Step 7: Put in the Booster Pump

To put in a booster pump, it's important to remember that the booster pump requires electricity, so it's a good idea to place it at least 5' away from any water source.

Connect a 3/8" compression fitting to the intake and outlet valves of the booster pump and tighten with a wrench. Remember: it's a good idea to use Teflon paste to any connections that will be under high water pressure.

Step 8: Attach the Water Line

Attach the water line from the pump to the intake valve on the booster pump and tighten with wrenches.

Make sure the pump sits on a secure base such as a steppingstone or a concrete paver (Image 1).

Run the outgoing line from the booster pump to the fountain (Image 2).

Step 9: Dig a Trench, and Bury the Line

Use a spade and dig a small trench from the booster pump over to the fountain. Be sure to go at least a few inches deep to bury the 3/8" line.

With the 3/8" compression fitting on the outlet valve, connect the outgoing water line to the pump. Secure the connection with wrenches.

Next, bury the line in the trench and make sure it is completely covered. Use a pipe cutter to trim any excess line by the fountain.

Step 10: Connect the Fittings and Copper Water Line

Connect the 3/8" compression fitting to the copper water line using the nut and ferrule and tighten the connection with wrenches.

Attach the 1/2" x 3/8" compression fitting to the copper line under the fountain and tighten.

Turn the pool pump isolation valve on. Plug the booster pump in and cover it to protect it from the elements.

Turn on the stop valve by the fountain and check for any leaks in the line.

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