DIY Network

How To Repair Wicker Furniture

Wicker furniture can become brittle and damaged with age, but it's easy to repair with materials available at most craft shops.

More in Decorating

spray paint repaired areas to match
  • Time

    2 hours

  • Price Range

    $1 - $50

  • Difficulty

    Easy

Highlights:

Step 1: Repair Loose Wrapping on the Legs

To repair a chair leg on which wicker wrapping has come loose, cut a length of wicker caning and soak it in water for about 30 minutes (Image 1) to make it more flexible. Apply a dab of glue under the end of the loose wrapping, then insert the end of the new strand, and tap it in place with a small tack (Image 2). Wrap the length of new cane snugly around the leg (Image 3), and add a dab of glue where it ends. Secure the end with another tack, and cut off any excess caning (Image 4).

Step 2: Repair Broken Strands in the Body

The technique for replacing a missing or broken strand of caning in the body of a wicker piece is similar to that described above. Soak a length of wicker strand in water for about 30 minutes. With a utility knife, cut off any protruding ends of the old strand (Image 1), and if possible, glue the end to the underside of an intersecting piece of cane. Once the new strand has softened, cut off a section slightly longer than the length of the piece being replaced. Place a small amount of glue inside the woven strands. Tuck one end into the woven wicker, next to the broken strand, and begin weaving the new piece in the same pattern as the old (Image 2), using a pair of needle-nose pliers to assist if necessary. Once the new strand is in place, cut off any excess, and tuck the end underneath an intersecting piece.

Step 3: Paint the Piece

After you've completed the repairs and the glue has dried, spray-paint the repaired areas to match the rest of the piece. Apply a light coat of spray paint, blending carefully with the surrounding areas and using even sweeps of paint to achieve a professional look. For pieces that are to be used outdoors, use an exterior-enamel spray.

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