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Blog Cabin

How to Install a Stamped Tin Ceiling (page 3 of 3)

Add vintage-chic style to a new room by installing a reclaimed stamped-tin ceiling.

More in Blog Cabin

  • Time

    Several Weekends

  • Price Range

    $500 - $1,000

  • Difficulty

    Moderate to Hard

Highlights:

Step 6: Making Panel Cut-Outs

To accommodate ceiling lights, ceiling vents, fan boxes and smoke alarms, measure carefully and, with tin snips, hand-cut openings in tin panels to ensure a snug fit.

Builder's Tip: It may be necessary to lower the ceiling fixture boxes to the level of the furring strips. Some modifications to the fixture boxes may require an electrician if the DIYer is unable to make the adjustment.

Step 7: Attaching Wall Cut Panels

Apply panels down the furring strips, working toward the light and/or the wall with the narrow panels. These panels must be carefully cut to fit snugly against the wall.

Builders Tip: When cutting the stamped tin ceiling panels at Blog Cabin 2011, a cutting table and cutting guide were set up to cut clean and straight panel lines with a circular saw.

Step 8: Install Ceiling Fixtures

When all ceiling panels have been installed, reattach the ceiling fixtures using the electrical safety tips provided above.

Optional Finish Work

Some stamped tin ceiling projects are finished with crown molding, decorative switch-plate covers or ornate medallions around center-of-the-room drop lights or chandeliers. A wide array of accessories like cornices and corner miter box embellishments can give the room a more finished look.

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