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How to Edge a Lawn (page 1 of 2)

Learn how edging can give your lawn and garden spaces a clean finish with these landscaping tips.

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Wooden Edging Keeps Garden Border Neat

Highlights:

It isn't essential to use edging around a lawn, but it does make the grass a more precise and distinctive feature and reduces the chore of keeping the edges neat.

Materials needed:

wooden edging
wood stain or preservative
string
half moon cutter
hammer or rubber mallet
scrap piece of wood

Prepare wood.

Wooden edging should be painted or treated with a wood preservative to prevent it from rotting. Do this at least 24 hours prior to inserting the edging panels into the ground.

Lay Out Border Edging Before Inserting in Ground

Courtesy of DK - Simple Steps to Success: Lawns and Groundcover © 2012 Dorling Kindersley Limited

Mark the spot for edging.

Peg a line of string taut along the desired edge, and use a half moon cutter to create a groove in the turf to a depth of about 3 inches. Remove any excess turf, and push back some soil so it will be easier to insert the edging

Use Half Moon Cutter to Create Groove for Edging

Courtesy of DK - Simple Steps to Success: Lawns and Groundcover © 2012 Dorling Kindersley Limited

Insert edging into ground.

Place the sections of wooden edging over the groove, and lightly tap them down using a hammer or rubber mallet. Place a piece of wood between the hammer and the edging to avoid damaging it.

Tap In Edging with Rubber Mallet

Courtesy of DK - Simple Steps to Success: Lawns and Groundcover © 2012 Dorling Kindersley Limited

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Simple Steps to Success: Lawns and Groundcover © 2012 Dorling Kindersley Limited

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