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How to Cut Small Parts on a Table Saw

Cutting small parts on a table saw can be a dangerous task. Create a jig that eliminates 99 percent of the danger by enabling users to keep their hands far from the blade.

More in Home Improvement

  • Time

    30 Minutes

  • Price Range

    $1 - $50

  • Difficulty

    Easy

Highlights:

Step 1: Cut the Base, and Center the Base on the Guides

Use the table saw to cut a slot through the center of the 3/4"-plywood base, cut the same length as the guides, about 2' wide. Place the guides -- two strips of 1" thick wood with a length equal to the width of the table saw and a width the same as the table saw's miter-gauge slots -- in the slots on either side of the table saw's blade. Center the plywood base on top of the guides (Image 1). Use drywall screws to secure the base to the two guides (Image 2).

Step 2: Drill Holes

Use a drill press to drill two holes in each 3" x 1-1/2" x 1" block to accept the T-nuts (Image 1). Insert the T-nuts into the holes. On the opposite sides of the 3" x 1-1/2" x 1" blocks, drill a 3/8" hole above each T-nut to accept the 3/8" bolts (Image 2).

Step 3: Screw in the Bolts

Place the blocks on either side of the plywood base, and hold them down with the clamps. Screw the bolts through the 3/8" holes.

screw bolts through holes

Step 4: Use the Jig

To use the jig, place the work piece above the slot on the jig, with the line that's to cut aligned with the slot (Image 1). Place a scrap piece of wood on top of the work piece, and clamp it down (Image 2). Raise the table-saw blade through the slot in front of the work piece. Slide the jig across the blade to cut through the work piece.

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