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How to Add Log Siding for a Rustic Look to Room

If you're looking for a rustic style -- or maybe even a cabin feel for your own bedroom -- here's a project from host Fuad Reveiz to make that happen.

More in Windows Walls and Doors

siding used to create custom shelves

Step 1: Form Boxes to Hold the Outlets

The light switch and power outlets need to be raised from the wall surface to match the thickness of the siding. To do this, create small 1-1/4" thick frames to box in each outlet. First, rip 2 x 4s down to 1" x 1-1/4". Next, cut the pieces to form a frame measuring 4" x 5-3/4". Assemble with a trim nailer.

light switch and power outlets made from frames

Step 2: Connect the Wires to the New Switches

Turn off the power at the breaker box. Remove the cover plate from the light switch, then back out the two screws that secure it to the electrical box. In this example, the switch covers are also being replaced. Cut the first wire, strip and push into the same location on the new switch's quick-connect slot. Do the same for the other wire.

Slip the frame over the switch, followed by an electrical box extender. Remove the original screws on top and bottom of switch, then use 2" screws to attach frame to the box. Add the new cover plate. Continue the process for other outlets, then turn the power on at the breaker box.

slip frame over switch

Step 3: Begin the Log Siding Installation

Measure the length of the first couple of logs and note the location of each outlet. Work from floor to ceiling to attach the tongue of each board directly to the wall.

Cut the first two boards to length. In this example, the boards also must be notched for the three wall outlets using a jig saw.

Step 4: Set the Logs into Place and Secure

Set the first log in place, resting atop the 1 x 6 baseboard (Image 1). Align the trim nailer to the stud lines drawn on the wall and attach the log with 8-penny nails.

Measure for the height of the outlet box in the second board and notch. Set the board atop the first one (Image 2), overlapping the tongue, and nail in place.

From this point upward, the logs are only cut to length, set into place and secured.

The last board near the ceiling won't have the tongue to nail into, so it can be secured to the wall at the thinner part of the bottom of the log.

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