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Custom Shelving Done 4 Ways (page 2 of 2)

Learn four different methods used to hang shelving; plus the best shelf material and how best to finish the shelves.
Excerpted from Do It Yourself Home Improvement

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Step-by-Step Instructions :

Assembling Twin-Slot Shelving

Draw a plumb line, using a level, where you want the first support. Hold a bracket against the line and mark the pin holes (Image 1).

Drill pilot holes and plug them, then screw the first bracket in place (Image 2). Use wood pieces to fill behind the bracket if the wall is uneven. Use 2-inch screws.

Hold the next bracket in place. Rest a level across the tops of both brackets to check for level (Image 3). You may find it helps to have someone hold the bracket. Adjust the position of the bracket until it is completely level with the first, fixed one. Pilot drill through the top pin hole, then secure in place.

Mark for other pilot holes, then swing bracket to one side. Drill the pilot holes, plug them, and loosely attach the bracket in place (Image 4).

Check that the bracket is plumb, then attach it securely. Hook the shelf supports into the wall brackets, taking care that they are level (Image 5).

Mark the position and depth of the brackets on the back of a shelf. Cut out this area with a chisel so that shelves will sit flush against the wall (Image 6).

Place shelves on the supports and insert small screws through the support into predrilled holes on the underside of the shelf (Image 7).

Invisible Bracketed (Floating) Shelves

The thicker the shelf material, the easier this system is to apply. Use rods one-third longer than the shelf's width. Measure and mark for attaching points on the back of the shelf roughly near the ends, and at similar intervals in between if spanning a wide space (Image 1).

Use a level to draw the shelf's position on the wall (Image 2). Hold the marked shelf up to it and mark the attaching points from the shelf on the wall.

Drill into the wall to a depth that equals two-thirds the width of the shelf. Use a bit slightly larger than the diameter of the threaded rods (Image 3).

Clamp the shelf securely. Drill at the attaching points to the depth of the holes in the wall, ensuring that the drill stays square to the wood (Image 4).

Inject resin into the drilled holes in the wall, and insert the rods (Image 5). Use a level to ensure that they are exactly straight.

When the resin has set, slide the shelf onto the rods (Image 6). Set a level on the shelf. If it is level, insert resin into the holes to attach it onto the rods.

Shelf Material and Finishing

MDF is the ideal shelf material because it is so easy to work with, but it usually needs finishing after construction. A decorative wooden molding or veneer can be attached to the edges of shelves to make them look like solid wood. The example here shows putting molding on the front of a shelf in an alcove. For simple back-and-side supported shelves, miter the fronts of the side supports to make them less obvious.

The edges of shelves can be filled and sanded. If there are gaps between any shelves and the wall, use a flexible filler on them. Do not use white filler if you are going to apply a natural wood finish; use stainable filler to match the finish.
If you paint shelves, leave them to dry for several days before using them; the usual 24 hours is not long enough to prevent items on a shelf from sticking to new paint.

Hammer molding in place with panel pins every 4 inches. Set the pins' heads below the surface.

Fill all pin holes in the shelves with filler, then sand smooth, and decorate as required.

Courtesy of DK - Do It Yourself Home Improvement © 2009 Dorling Kindersley Limited

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Excerpted from Do It Yourself Home Improvement

© Dorling Kindersley Limited 2009

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