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Tips on Using Wood Glue

Different types of wood require different kinds of glue. Here's a brief guide to choosing and using the right wood glue for any project.

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different types of wood require different glues

Yellow, or carpenter's, glue is the most basic kind of wood glue. It can be applied in temperatures from 40 to 100 degrees Fahrenheit. Before using carpenter's glue to attach two pieces of wood edge-to-edge, place a line of masking tape down one side of the joint, spanning the crack with the tape. Then flip the pieces of wood over and apply glue inside the joint. Secure the two pieces and use a cloth to wipe off any excess glue. Remove the tape and repeat the process for the other side of the joint.

Polyurethane glue is appropriate for a variety of projects, as it may be used indoors and outdoors. Before applying polyurethane glue, wet the piece of wood with a damp cloth. After applying the glue, immediately clamp the pieces together, and allow 24 hours for the glue to dry. Clean off any excess polyurethane glue with mineral spirits.

White glue is easy to clean and dries clear. It's suitable for use on lightweight material such as paper, leather and some types of wood. When using white glue to bond two pieces of particleboard, use a rubber paint roller to spread the glue evenly over the wood. Then secure the pieces of wood in place and clamp them together. Allow at least one hour for the glue to dry thoroughly.

Epoxy glue is made by mixing two agents (a resin and a hardener) in exact proportions. Epoxy is frequently used to fill gaps in imperfectly matched joints. It's often a good idea to mix a little sawdust from the wood you're gluing into the epoxy mixture. This helps ensure that the glue will dry the same color as the wood.

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