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Eastern Influence: Using Japanese Tools

David Thiel talks with Sandor Nagyszalanczy, author of Tools: Rare and Ingenious, and cabinetmaker Patrick Huggins about the proper use of these beautiful handmade Japanese tools.

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Pull-Stroke Saws(14 of 17)

Like the hand plane, the Japanese saw cuts on the pull stroke while Western saws traditionally cut on the push stroke. Cutting on the pull stroke allows the tool to have a thinner blade. This provides a smoother, faster cut. The teeth of the Japanese saw, seen here on the left, are close to the blade, which provides a finer cut. It has one set of teeth on one side for ripping and another set of teeth used for both applications. The Western saw, seen here on the right, has one set of teeth used for both applications.

Note: the Japanese saw is preferred when it comes to detail cutting or cutting wood quickly.

Next Photo: Different Cuts

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