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How to Inspect the Exterior of Your Home (page 2 of 2)

Prevent problems before they begin -- learn what to look for and how to properly maintain the exterior structure of your home.

Excerpted from Do It Yourself Home Improvement

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6. Brickwork

Brick siding should have sound pointing, with no holes or gaps in joints.

Brick has Aesthetic,Thermal and Accoustic Appeal

Courtesy of DK - Do It Yourself Home Improvement © 2009 Dorling Kindersley Limited

7. Paving

Joints should be well pointed, and water should run off away from the house and into drainage channels.

Driveways Should be Kept in Good Condition

Courtesy of DK - Do It Yourself Home Improvement © 2009 Dorling Kindersley Limited

8. Decking

This should be well treated with preservative, have no decay, and be free from algae.

wooden deck

9. Flat Roofs

These need to be kept clear of debris and vegetation. Holes should be patched immediately with a primer made specially for the type of roofing surface.

Cover Hole with Self Adhesive Patching

Courtesy of DK - Do It Yourself Home Improvement © 2009 Dorling Kindersley Limited

10. Fences and Paths

Fences should be kept vertical, and wooden ones well preserved. Paths should be well maintained. Driveways should be free of holes, craters, and standing water. Vegetation should be cleared from the surface.

Private backyard

11. Stucco

There should be no cracks or holes. Vegetative growth will encourage mildew, and should be treated before repainting.

12. Roof Tiles

Slates or tiles should not be cracked, broken, or out of position. Any valleys should be clear of debris. Ridge tiles should all be in place, and their mortar must be in sound condition, with no cracks or holes.

Don't Forget Proper Drainage

Many exterior maintenance tasks involve ensuring smooth and efficient drainage from your home and into underground drainage systems in order to keep your home free from flood problems. Waste water is directed into the sewer system or septic tank through a network of underground pipes. Inspection chambers, situated below manhole covers, allow access to the pipes should problems occur. Rainwater is channeled into a separate system, or may run into the sewer. In older homes, both rainwater and waste water may drain into the sewer through the same network of pipes. Older systems should be regularly maintained, and updated when possible.

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Excerpted from Do It Yourself Home Improvement

© Dorling Kindersley Limited 2009

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