Media Room Pictures From Blog Cabin 2013

The home's second-floor relaxation and gathering space offers the high-tech features of a home theater, plus concealed sleeping space for overnight guests.

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Photo By: Frank Murray

Photo By: Frank Murray

Photo By: Frank Murray

Photo By: Frank Murray

Photo By: Frank Murray

Photo By: Frank Murray

Photo By: Frank Murray

Photo By: Frank Murray

Photo By: Frank Murray

Photo By: Frank Murray

Photo By: Frank Murray

Photo By: Frank Murray

Photo By: Jason Kisner

Photo By: Frank Murray

Photo By: Frank Murray

Photo By: Frank Murray

The ceiling, clad in whitewashed juniper, is vaulted to visually expand the space. The home's cool coastal color palette extends into this space, where furnishings represent a mix of both old and new.

A chaise sofa, upholstered in durable Sunbrella sailcloth fabric, offers a soft spot to unwind, relax and watch TV. A striped jute rug anchors the space and ties the room's furnishings and accessories together.

"The crazy part about this space is that even though we used all of this old wood, it's not overwhelmingly rustic or oppressive in any way," says Mega Dens show host Anitra Mecadon. "By whitewashing the ceiling and using that incredible blue wall color we were able to create that funky-fresh cottage cabin we were going for. "

The bottom of a storage box, discovered in the home's original "birthing room," is painted in a bright, happy green shade and topped with an old directional sign placed at the bottom of the home's former ship ladder-style staircase.

An exposed self-supporting ridge beam, paired with original, now decorative, beams lends visual interest in the space. A brand-new roof with rafters above the ceiling has been completely foamed to improve the home's insulation value.

Inspired by vintage advertising signs that dot the Crystal Coast, the underside of a Murphy bed unit features decorative art created by theatrical painter Jillian Mitchell. In a process that took two hours, the design was outlined in pencil, colored in with diluted wall paint, aged with a diluted stain and rubbed at the edges to achieve a weathered look.

The 6' x 6' wall art panel pulls down to reveal a twin bunk bed, fashioned from prefinished plywood and only $30 worth of hardware supplies. The unit is located in the area that once served as the top of the home's original ship ladder-style staircase.

The ridge beam is wrapped in original beam wood that was ripped down, holes plugged and surface planed. To achieve a vintage look, the wood wrap was stained with a mixture of vinegar and steel wool. "We spritzed it on (sporadically) to add to the natural funk that occurs over time and then wiped them down with a dark wax," says Anitra Mecadon. "They popped off of the whitewashed juniper: It was super fresh and rustic all at the same time."

A cozy corner is dedicated to the art of fine wines and cocktails. A custom-crafted table offers a sunny spot to work on projects, read or surf the Web.

"The upcycled furniture bar was made out of wardrobe pieces that still had clothing in them when we got there," says Anitra Mecadon. Two furnishings were stitched together, tops sealed with a special pine finish, a galvanized pail inset in the chest top and a custom frame installed to a house a wine cooler.

Track lighting, selected for its resemblance to knob and tube wiring, brightens the room and shines a spotlight on unique upcycled-wood artwork.

To fashion the reclaimed wood desktop, the home's original corner posts were cut down, segments attached, and the surface sanded and sealed with a clear finish. Piping forms the base and legs; casters were welded in place.

Candlelight adds the right touch of ambiance as the sun sets on Core Sound.

"My favorite project this year would have to be the upcycled bar we made out of furniture from the original house," says Anitra Mecadon. "I am sure there are a ton of homeowners out there with similar hand-me-downs: They hold sentimental value, but just aren't that great to look at anymore. Here's an idea: Turn them into a bar. Talk about DIY home run!"

An art installation makes a rustic, beachy statement. Pieces of the home's original sheathing were cut with a saw on the back side, cracked apart by hand and topped with pieces of crocodile-skin metal from an old curved-top chest. The finishing touch, Mason jars found on-site, are filled with sand from the property's own beach.

A rolling door crafted from reclaimed wood separates media room from the second-floor landing. Seeded glass ensures that light from the home's sunniest space bleeds into the hallway and down the staircase.