Construction Diary from Blog Cabin 2015

Browse weekly construction photos and get the scoop on what's happening at Blog Cabin 2015 in Coeur d'Alene, Idaho.

Photo By: Dylan Eastman

Photo By: Dylan Eastman

Photo By: Dylan Eastman

Photo By: Dylan Eastman

Photo By: Dylan Eastman

Photo By: Edwards Smith Construction

Photo By: Edwards Smith Construction

Photo By: Edwards Smith Construction

Photo By: Edwards Smith Construction

Photo By: Edwards Smith Construction

Photo By: Edwards Smith Construction

Photo By: Dylan Eastman

Photo By: Dylan Eastman

Photo By: Dylan Eastman

Photo By: Dylan Eastman

Photo By: Dylan Eastman

Photo By: Dylan Eastman

Photo By: Dylan Eastman

Photo By: Dylan Eastman

Photo By: Dylan Eastman

Photo By: Dylan Eastman

Photo By: Dylan Eastman

Photo By: Dylan Eastman

Photo By: Dylan Eastman

Photo By: Dylan Eastman

We saved what we could from the original house footprint, including the fireplace covered in a locally quarried "Idaho Diamond". Photo courtesy of Edwards Smith Construction

The forms are being set for the new foundation wall pour. Photo courtesy of Edwards Smith Construction

The new foundation walls are tied into the originals with rebar pins. We've rebuilt the garage and added the master suite. Photo courtesy of Dylan Eastman

This bird's eye view is the lake side wall as it peers out to amazing mountain views. Photo courtesy of Dylan Eastman

There could be much worse places to work! This is an everyday view in Coeur d'Alene. Photo courtesy of Dylan Eastman

The new walls have been poured and stripped of the forms. Here you can see the tops of the sill anchors at the entrance. Photo courtesy of Dylan Eastman

This is the opposite shot from Cabin Cam, viewed from the existing driveway uphill. Photo courtesy of Dylan Eastman

The original garage was in such bad shape. We had to repour it with proper vertical reinforcement. Photo courtesy of Dylan Eastman

Edward Smith Construction crews are adding new drainboard and waterproofing membrane to the bermed walls. While the earth is a great climate buffer in the winter (free heat!) it is also a source of troublesome moisture that was leaking into the original house. Photo courtesy of Dylan Eastman

The new steel columns have been stood on frost depth compliant footings. These hold the GluLam beams for the first floor. The steel finish saddles will be exposed adding to the home's design intent. Photo courtesy of Dylan Eastman

Buff, of Edward Smith Construction, consults the crew on the work for the week ahead. Just take a look at that view! Photo courtesy of Dylan Eastman

Since the original lower level only had 8' ceilings with a slab poured too low, we added triple wall plates to keep 8' once the new slab is properly poured over the footings. You can also see the mezzanine and stairway GluLams set with face mount joist hangers. Photo courtesy of Edwards Smith Construction

Setting the beams was a huge step in the framing of the house. I know some of you eagerly watched all four go in via the camera. Photo courtesy of Edwards Smith Construction

Because we used engineered joists for the roof, it allowed us to easily cantilever large overhangs on the house. These are 11 7/8" deep joists, which fulfill the need for R-38 roof insulation. Because we are using a combination of foam and fiberglass, we do not need to vent the roof assembly. Photo courtesy of Edwards Smith Construction

Because the existing house was already bermed into the hill, we took advantage of the situation and kept the uphill view of the house low and tied to the earth. The mastersuite and entry roofs will break up the mono sloped roof line. Photo courtesy of Edwards Smith Construction

The existing foundation walls had no insulation or waterproofing. As you've seen, we excavated the entire perimeter to remedy this. Right now we are backfilling with drain rock and filter fabric to keep water away from the lower level. Photo courtesy of Dylan Eastman

Can you feel the 2D plans becoming dimensional yet? To fit with the overall architecture, we used steel columns to support the roof beams. Photo courtesy of Dylan Eastman

The large glue laminated beams nestle into the saddles of the steel columns. Photo courtesy of Dylan Eastman

These high shower windows give a balance of light to the master bathroom, while respecting the privacy of occupants. Photo courtesy of Dylan Eastman

As viewed from the master suite, the core of the original house has transformed from low flat truss chords and short windows to a high side lake wall that lets light spill into the core of the living spaces. Photo courtesy of Dylan Eastman

Using proper fall protection, our construction crews are making short time of drying in the structure. Photo courtesy of Dylan Eastman

Standing at the walkway behind the master bath, you can see how our open mezzanine creates awesome views from the lower and upper levels. Photo courtesy of Dylan Eastman

This cozy library will feature seating, library shelves, and a two sided fireplace that allows unimpeded views. Photo courtesy of Dylan Eastman

Though we couldn't keep the upper fireplace, the lower one is intact. We've pinned the top for an over pour that starts the base of the new fireplace. Photo courtesy of Dylan Eastman

The lakeside wall is almost complete. The beams carry the roof load while the wall studs support the windows and doors. Photo courtesy of Dylan Eastman

Here's a great view from the guest bath up and into the core of the house. Photo courtesy of Dylan Eastman

To the right of the lower fireplace, we've added an opening between the game room and the lower family room. Photo courtesy of Dylan Eastman

Our engineered floor joists are flush hangered to the back of the laminated beams. This keeps the floor system intact while allowing the beam to be a finished surface you see at the mezzanine. Photo courtesy of Dylan Eastman

Soon we'll set the center stairs. It will feature a couple of elements similar to Blog Cabin 2013, yet still matching the design of this house. Photo courtesy of Dylan Eastman

This is the family room view back up towards the master bath. Photo courtesy of Dylan Eastman

Here the foyer roof is not yet completed. It over frames the main 1.5/12 roof with a 2.5/12 slope. Here, we are finishing the foundation insulation and waterproofing. Photo courtesy of Dylan Eastman

Believe it or not this house sits on its original foundation walls and in the exact same footprint. Only the 21'x12' master suite is additional floor space. Photo courtesy of Dylan Eastman

The lower level fireplace was over poured to form the base for the first-floor, rebuilt chimney. This was critical to have continuous waterproofing across this exterior deck. Photo courtesy of Dylan Eastman

The original house had a porch here that was gone when we arrived. Unfortunately, everything about this area was wrong and required pouring new walls and reframing. Here the crews are applying waterproofing as the new pergola space is over the interior game room. Photo courtesy of Edwards Smith Construction

Renovation can have unexpected situations, like the substandard water lines that had to be replaced to the existing well. Photo courtesy of Edwards Smith Construction

To complement the design this year, we used steel beams at the main deck. It allowed me to space the vertical columns much further apart. This deck could not be cantilevered easily like the master suite, so the fewer the posts the better. Photo courtesy of Edwards Smith Construction

I love finding product stamps like these. These beams will be brushed clean and clear coated. In these parts, we do not deal with salt and rust issues like on the East coast. Photo courtesy of Edwards Smith Construction

As some of you have spotted on the blog, this new square excavation is new. In this case, we needed a new septic system and the tank goes here. Photo courtesy of Edwards Smith Construction

Can you see the entrance coming together? As some have noted the windows on this side are smaller. In a passive solar design setting, these windows are on the "cold" side of the house and are here for light balance. Once you see the rooms built out they will make more sense. In the center we have a main entrance door with two 14" sidelites. Photo courtesy of Edwards Smith Construction

Max of Edwards Smith Construction tightens clamps on some glue laminated beams in preparation for a cut. This is going to take a big saw. Photo courtesy of Dylan Eastman

As viewed from another angle, what is this beam for? Let me know what you think on the blog. Photo courtesy of Dylan Eastman

These short Douglas Fir beams go with the longer ones seen in the previous photo. Photo courtesy of Dylan Eastman

See, I told you it would take a big saw. Hold on tight! Photo courtesy of Dylan Eastman

We really have been lucky to have amazing weather this winter keeping construction at full speed. Photo courtesy of Dylan Eastman

Each roofline serves a unique function. The form truly follows function. Photo courtesy of Dylan Eastman

The side deck area has been waterproofed and is ready for concrete. Photo courtesy of Dylan Eastman

The view from Cabin Cam. I join you more mornings than you know from behind the camera. Photo courtesy of Dylan Eastman

Your portal to the site, the Cabin Cam. Photo courtesy of Dylan Eastman

From idea to drawing, vote choices to reality, we really make a good team. Photo courtesy of Dylan Eastman

I have one word, gorgeous. We used glue laminated beams to form the mezzanine and the stairs allow the structure to remain as the finish. Photo courtesy of Dylan Eastman

For energy and time efficiency, we foamed only the first few inches of the 12" roof assembly. The foam removes the need for a vented ceiling and provides an air seal, while batt insulation rounds out the remained of the R-value. Photo courtesy of Dylan Eastman

With the pergola slab poured, Edwards Smith crew members check some last minute items on the roof. Photo courtesy of Dylan Eastman

Our concrete maven, Nathan, took some artistic liberties with the concrete retardent removal in honor of us. Photo courtesy of Dylan Eastman