Waterside Porch Pictures From Blog Cabin 2013

With breathtaking views of Core Sound, this classic Southern outdoor space commands attention.

Photo By: Frank Murray

Photo By: Frank Murray

Photo By: Frank Murray

Photo By: Frank Murray

Photo By: Jason Kisner

Photo By: Jason Kisner

Photo By: Jason Kisner

Photo By: Frank Murray

Photo By: Jason Kisner

Photo By: Jason Kisner

Photo By: Jason Kisner

Photo By: Frank Murray

A grand front porch offers stellar water views and three entries to the home: central double doors into the great room, an east entrance into the sunroom and a west entrance into the mud hall and laundry room.

Folding chairs cozy up to an acacia wood pub table. "Down here, everybody goes out to look at the sunset, sit on the porch, because the weather's conducive to that. Why not?" says interior designer Emily Guthrie. "I put the table above the rails so you can look out and enjoy the sunset and water views."

Hardy, drought-tolerant landscape elements lend permanence to the property and also camouflage the foundation, elevated 8 feet above sea level.

The beadboard ceiling, double-hung windows and cedar shake-style composite siding tell a story of the home's former self and Atlantic, N.C., architectural history.

Ceiling fans cool this outdoor space, while recessed lighting illuminates seating areas well into the night.

A wireless fence system enables the homeowner to custom-design boundaries for an unlimited number of pets. The system covers half an acre of yard.

Synthetic-wicker chairs, topped in Sunbrella fabric cushions, offer style plus durability.

A pub table overlooks the outdoor kitchen and is nested steps away from the home's indoor spaces. "It's lightweight and perfect for informal dining," says interior designer Jody Wiener.

Acacia wood rocking chairs can be painted or oiled, says interior designer Emily Guthrie, who considers the furnishings a must-have along Core Sound. "Here, everybody has rockers," she says. "When you come to the beach, you rock."

A stainless steel cable system paired with Ipe wood forms the porch railing. "There was the option of doing the typical white balusters," says project manager Dylan Eastman. "But we were trying to keep the view out to the water and up to the house as open as possible."

Wax myrtle, which naturally flourishes in wetland areas, will grow to form a hedge along the porch front.

Paneled non-tapered square columns, spaced 8 feet apart, lend strength and elegance to the porch design. The pressure-treated pine columns are clad in fiber-cement siding to ensure durability.