Pergola Pictures From Blog Cabin 2013

Once covered on three sides by grapevines, a cedar post and reclaimed-wood structure will offer a shaded outdoor living room.

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Photo By: Frank Murray

Photo By: Jason Kisner

Photo By: Frank Murray

Photo By: Frank Murray

Photo By: Frank Murray

Photo By: Jason Kisner

Photo By: Jack Parker

Photo By: Jason Kisner

Photo By: Jason Kisner

Photo By: Jason Kisner

Photo By: Jason Kisner

Photo By: Jason Kisner

Photo By: Jason Kisner

Photo By: Jason Kisner

Photo By: Jason Kisner

Photo By: Jason Kisner

A pea gravel surface outlines this outdoor living area while a pergola offers visual interest and a support system for growing muscadine grapevines, which will eventually create three living walls. "You'll have a view of water, but all that plant matter will make this area cooler and more shaded," says project manager Dylan Eastman.

Classic and in keeping with coastal North Carolina design, acacia wood Adirondack chairs carve out a conversation area. Rather than paint the chairs, pillows and flowering plants provide needed pops of color.

The pergola was constructed 8 feet to the left of the property's original muscadine grape-covered arbor so as not to block water views on approach from the driveway.

The reconstructed dock is topped with kiln-dried Southern pine, which has been sealed with an ultraviolet-light-blocking stain.

Cedar corner posts are treated with Eco Wood, a stain that protects wood while lending a slightly silver patina that complements vintage wood beams.

Muscadine cultivars include Carlos and Tara bronze grapes and Noble, Nesbitt and Supreme black grapes.

Wire trellises run the length of posts to support grape-vines as they grow up and over the pergola.

Sand-filled pits invite guests to play a game or two of horseshoe before the sun sets.

Old pine wood, sourced from an historic home in Beaufort being torn down and rebuilt, is fashioned into rustic pergola beams. "That wood was saved from the landfill for very little money," says project manager Dylan Eastman.

Trailing petunias, nestled amidst neutral wood finishes, lend a needed pop of color.

Grapevines will go up and out, creating a shaded structure supported by three living walls.

Posts reclaimed from the grape arbor frame water views and welcome visitors into the outdoor space.

Every effort was made to preserve existing vegetation, including yellow and cedar pine trees, plus pepper vine that grows along the property boundaries.

Solar steppingstones, fashioned from epoxy-joined river rock and glow-in-the-dark pebbles, brighten the pathway to the dock on clear summer nights.

A changing show of color, potted plants can be relocated as weather conditions warrant.

"At the end of my two-day build, I took my work boots off and walked out by myself to the edge of the long Blog Cabin dock and took a seat," says Yard Crashers host Matt Blashaw. "The wind was gently blowing and the sun was setting, casting a beautiful red glow on the water. It was so quiet that I could hear every wave lap onto the shore. I never felt more at peace and I know the winner will have that same amazing feeling. It is truly a magical place."