Entryway Pictures From Blog Cabin 2013

Hand-scraped bamboo flooring leads from the sunroom to the home's main light-filled living space.

Related To:

  1. Cabins
  2. Foyers
  3. Bamboo
  4. Wood

Photo By: Jason Kisner

Photo By: Frank Murray

Photo By: Frank Murray

Photo By: Jason Kisner

Photo By: Jason Kisner

Photo By: Frank Murray

Photo By: Jason Kisner

Photo By: Jason Kisner

Photo By: Frank Murray

Photo By: Jason Kisner

Photo By: Frank Murray

Photo By: Jason Kisner

Photo By: Frank Murray

Photo By: Frank Murray

Durable bamboo planks, twice as hard as oak and hand-scraped to replicate the look of vintage farmhouse floors, lead from sunroom to entry, where a dramatic switchback staircase ascends to the second floor.

Three risers, installed in the landing, tighten the footprint of the staircase's vertical shaft. The open design of the oak and hickory structure allows sunlight to stream down from second-floor spaces, including a vintage-style cupola.

The threshold from sunroom to entryway once served as the home's exterior side door. Although the home was reframed, "we kept original outside walls 2x6 because that's what was here," says project manager Dylan Eastman. "All new walls are 2x4s."

A nod to the home's coastal location, seashells gathered along the property's shoreline make a subtle design statement when placed atop a rustic-chic demilune table in the entryway.

A cozy alcove nestled below the staircase offers a reading and relaxation nook. Recessed shelving provides a spot to display curios and a custom bench, topped with throw pillows in the home's cool, coastal color palette, becomes a focal point.

A twinkling star in the night sky inspired House Crashers host Josh Temple's bench design, crafted with crown-molding material. "The complicated thing about it is that there are 90-degree angles and 45-degree angles, and then all of them have to be mitered on both inside and outside corners. So you have to build each panel, then match the miters, then install in sequence," he says.

A coat rack, fashioned from one of the home's original rafters, features metal accents stripped from an old curved-top chest found in the home. Brass cleats, sourced from an old boat on nearby Harkers Island, double as hooks.

The opposing side of an interior wall, added to accommodate kitchen cabinetry, doubles as an art installation. The home's original window sashes frame photos of the renovation process, building materials reclaimed from the home and Portsmouth Island, where a circa-1894 Lifesaving Station inspired the home's cupola design.

A budget-chic railing trick, decorative balusters are paired with balusters and newels fashioned from stainless steel tubing.

Channels, routed in the bottom of stair treads, accommodate LED light strips. "They serve as a nightlight in the evening when other home lights are turned down low," says project manager Dylan Eastman.

The traditional stair-rail style, chosen by online voters, echoes the nautical styling of stainless steel porch railing and allows light to flow uninterrupted from second- to first-floor spaces.

An elegantly turned hickory handrail volute is easily customizable with a mortgage button or other decorative accessory.

When reconfiguring the floor plan, attention was paid to opening rooms and improving flow of natural light. Project manager Dylan Eastman points to the home's balance of windows and unique light sources, including the cupola and door transoms. "Light that travels down to the landing spills into the family room and light from the family room spills into the landing so that there are never any dark areas in this house," he says.

"This year's Blog Cabin is very special. It starts with a breathtaking location in a gorgeous part of the country," says House Crashers show host Josh Temple. "And thanks to the voters, it is designed to keep the cozy coastal vibe."