East Entry Pictures From Blog Cabin 2013

The home's original drive, repaved with pea gravel, leads to a gracious side entrance and flagstone walkway.

Related To:

  1. Cabins
  2. Remodeling

Photo By: Jason Kisner

Photo By: Frank Murray

Photo By: Jason Kisner

Photo By: Jason Kisner

Photo By: Frank Murray

Photo By: Frank Murray

Photo By: Jason Kisner

Photo By: Jason Kisner

Photo By: Jason Kisner

Photo By: Jason Kisner

Photo By: Jason Kisner

Photo By: Jason Kisner

Photo By: Jason Kisner

Photo By: Jason Kisner

Photo By: Jason Kisner

Photo By: Jason Kisner

Photo By: Frank Murray

Photo By: Frank Murray

Photo By: Jason Kisner

Photo By: Jason Kisner

Photo By: Frank Murray

Photo By: Frank Murray

Photo By: Frank Murray

A natural pathway leads from the driveway to the home's covered side entrance, shaded by the property's grand cedar trees.

The master suite boasts a private entry porch outfitted with a custom-crafted porch swing. Although it maintains its original location, the master suite has been expanded in the bathroom area and topped with a second-floor guest bedroom.

Super-hardy coastal rosemary, a native evergreen shrub, lines a gravel-paved path that leads to the expansive front yard.

Ipe, a tropical hardwood, forms porch railing. The strong, durable decking material is naturally resistant to decay, wet conditions and insect infestation.

The side door, flanked by a nautical-style caged sconce, opens into the home's light-filled sunroom, a space designed for reflection and relaxation.

A hanging brass ship's bell stands in place of a traditional doorbell or knocker. The decorative door hardware, selected by online voters, offers a nod to the Core Sound maritime traditions of boat-building and commercial fishing.

Synthetic wicker chairs, topped with durable Sunbrella fabric-covered cushions, provide a front-row seat to nature and the changing seasons Down East.

The front door is flanked by an oleander-filled ceramic planter that adds a pop of color and fragrance as one passes from outdoor to indoor spaces.

Shrub-like pink lantana will bloom through October and attract butterflies to the property.

Replacing the home's original tree-trunk foundation, a sturdy brick-faced, cement-block foundation elevates the home eight feet above sea level. Bricks, inscribed "Built by Pake July 1895" and playfully embedded within the foundation, were sourced from the home's chimney.

Casement windows in the sunroom can be cranked open to capture cool coastal breezes.

Stone was the pathway material of choice among online voters who contributed to selection of many of the home's building materials, fixtures and features.

Shredded pine mulch provides a soft blanket of protection atop landscape beds, planted with native, hardy (and many flowering) species.

Propped atop maritime pilings, a copper mailbox, selected by online voters, suits the home's remote coastal location.

The remodeling team maintained the home's original 8 to 12 roof pitch angles, while raising ceiling height from 7 to 8 feet to accommodate larger windows and door openings.

Landscape design incorporates location-appropriate purple fountain grasses, which provide showy plumes and help to prevent erosion.

Should storm conditions warrant, a generator provides backup energy. Fueled by the property's propane tank, the generator switches on automatically when the system senses a loss of grid power.

A super-efficient, ductless mini split system operates three indoor heating and cooling units, located in the first-floor sunroom and master bedroom and second-floor guest bedroom.

When lacy green leaves change in early fall, a Seiryu Japanese maple will offer intense color in the home's far corner.

The under-porch area remains exposed so water from storm surges can flow unobstructed through foundation flood vents that lead to an unconditioned crawlspace.

Wax myrtles and coastal rosemary — both evergreen and aromatic — replace the home's original hydrangea bushes and will grow to form a natural privacy and weather protection screen.

"This year's Blog Cabin is nestled in one of the most beautiful landscapes I have every stepped into," says Yard Crashers host Matt Blashaw. "It is truly a magical place."

To maintain the home's historical charm, new windows echo the original four-over-four grid pattern. "There are two styles down here on the old houses: this pattern and a three-over-one, which is more in keeping with Craftsman style," says project manager Dylan Eastman.

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