Blog Cabin 2012: Remodeling Diary

If Blog Cabin could talk, what story would it have to tell about the remodeling process? Take a visual tour of the most captivating moments, captured in beautiful photos.

Photo By: Jackson Riley Parker, Jack Parker

Photo By: Darren Setlow Photography, LLC

Photo By: Øÿÿÿ

Photo By: Jackson Riley Parker

Photo By: Darren Setlow Photography, LLC

Photo By: Jackson Riley Parker

Photo By: Jackson Riley Parker

Photo By: Jackson Riley Parker

Photo By: Darren Setlow Photography, LLC

Photo By: Jackson Riley Parker

Photo By: Darren Setlow Photography, LLC

Photo By: Darren Setlow Photography, LLC

Photo By: ÿˇˇˇ

Photo By: Darren Setlow Photography, LLC

Photo By: Darren Setlow Photography, LLC

Photo By: Darren Setlow Photography, LLC

Photo By: Darren Setlow Photography, LLC

Photo By: Frank Murray

Photo By: Darren Setlow Photography, LLC

Photo By: Jackson Riley Parker

Photo By: Darren Setlow Photography, LLC

Photo By: Jackson Riley Parker

Photo By: Frank Murray

Photo By: Darren Setlow Photography, LLC

Photo By: Jackson Riley Parker

Photo By: Darren Setlow Photography, LLC

Photo By: Frank Murray

Photo By: Jackson Riley Parker

Photo By: Darren Setlow Photography, LLC

Photo By: Jackson Riley Parker

Photo By: Frank Murray

Photo By: Jackson Riley Parker

Photo By: Jackson Riley Parker

Photo By: Darren Setlow Photography, LLC

Photo By: Jackson Riley Parker

Photo By: Jackson Riley Parker

Photo By: Darren Setlow Photography, LLC

Photo By: Frank Murray

Photo By: Jackson Riley Parker

Photo By: Darren Setlow Photography, LLC

Photo By: Jackson Riley Parker

Photo By: Darren Setlow Photography, LLC

Photo By: Darren Setlow Photography, LLC

Photo By: Jackson Riley Parker

Photo By: Jackson Riley Parker

Photo By: Jason Kisner

Photo By: Jackson Riley Parker

Photo By: Frank Murray

Photo By: Jackson Riley Parker

Photo By: Darren Setlow Photography, LLC

Photo By: Darren Setlow Photography, LLC

Photo By: Jackson Riley Parker

Photo By: Darren Setlow Photography, LLC

Photo By: Frank Murray

Photo By: Darren Setlow Photography, LLC

Photo By: Jackson Riley Parker

Photo By: Darren Setlow Photography, LLC

Photo By: Darren Setlow Photography, LLC

Photo By: Darren Setlow Photography, LLC

Photo By: Darren Setlow Photography, LLC

Photo By: Darren Setlow Photography, LLC

Photo By: Jackson Riley Parker

Photo By: Jackson Riley Parker

Photo By: Jackson Riley Parker

Photo By: Jackson Riley Parker

Photo By: Jackson Riley Parker

Photo By: Darren Setlow Photography, LLC

Photo By: Jackson Riley Parker

Photo By: Darren Setlow Photography, LLC

Photo By: Darren Setlow Photography, LLC

Blog Cabin originally nestled on 80 acres of working farmland.

The home's original staircase newel post is reclaimed.

A buttercup-dotted path leads to the shoreline.

A classic red barn stands across the street from the home.

A worker fashions a support rail for the media room's sliding barn door.

Twin chimneys remain as a strictly architectural element.

The dark and gloomy attic finds new life as a media and game room.

Thirty wooded acres of Blog Cabin 2012 property was donated to the Medomak Valley Land Trust in Waldoboro, Maine.

Blog Cabin's barn stands in near-mint condition.

Donated Blog Cabin land abuts Peters Pond, a 12-acre lake that boasts steep granite cliffs.

Vintage cast-iron wheels, purchased at a metal salvage yard, are used in a sliding barn door project.

Red wood shakes, weathered from years of harsh coastal winds and moisture, lend distinction to the barn.

Farmers' markets and general stores are a short country drive from Blog Cabin 2012.

Anitra Mecadon and her Mega Dens team build a barn-style doghouse.

An antique chimney cleanout door provides an interesting visual element.

Building materials reclaimed from the remodeling process are stored in the barn.

Fiberboard siding lends a clean finishing touch to exteriors.

Branches of forsythia droop from the weight of canary-yellow blooms.

Blog Cabin's classic barn could house a workshop or home office.

After a good scrubbing, the home's old gutters find new use as table edging.

Many furnishings within the home were fashioned on-site from reclaimed materials.

During early spring 2012, the home's expanded deck takes shape.

The home's original brick chimneys were removed on first floors and secured with braces on the second floor.

Dutch Neck Peninsula is surrounded by picturesque coves.

A custom bed frame is fashioned for the master bedroom.

An antique jewelry chest is whitewashed and reclaimed as an end table.

Overgrown shrubbery offers privacy in Blog Cabin's side yard.

The home's original windows were shipped to the homesite from Boston during the late 1800s.

Stripped of old shakes, Blog Cabin prepares for new siding and windows.

An operable skylight invites natural light into the second-floor media room.

Vintage wooden doors, salvaged from interiors, are stored for new use.

The home's front facade, overgrown with shrubbery, demands a facelift.

Old porch columns form the legs of a reclaimed wood dining table.

Team members take a break from filming a Blog Cabin 2012 episode.

Online voters selected the compass design of the backyard patio.

Exterior doorways were reconfigured to improve traffic — and light — flow.

A composite window assembly in the living room provides picturesque meadow and water views.

Nonfunctional chimneys remain as a decorative feature.

The barn found use as a hay storage facility through the 1980s.

Colonial-style lighting fixtures are removed in preparation for the remodeling process.

Old wood planks are planed in preparation for construction of a dining table.

Desperate Landscapes show host Jason Cameron plants a series of hemlocks in the front yard.

The original lighting rod moves into the living room as a decorative accent.

A fresh coat of spray paint makes metal shade pendants in the media room pop against rustic wood surfaces.

Land behind the Blog Cabin barn was once reserved for grazing cattle.

Old table legs set on casters form the base of a new living room coffee table.

Blog Cabin's original front door is sealed off and a new entrance provides space for a mud area and foyer.

Australian cypress flooring is installed in the living room.

The Blog Cabin property is one of the last of the original land grants on Dutch Neck that has not been subdivided or developed.

The second-floor hallway, in as-is condition, gets an update with hardwood flooring and more.

A new floor plan drastically alters Blog Cabin's interior living space.

Blog Cabin is transformed with new windows, siding and roofing.

Interior doors form the foundation of intriguing master bedroom wall paneling.

Foam insulation is sprayed between rafters in the attic-turned-media room to ensure energy efficiency.

Many of the home's existing light fixtures are repurposed.

A new switchback staircase takes up a fraction of the space reserved for the home's original double staircase.

A team worker carefully places mats of cobblestone to form a compass-shaped back patio.

Mature trees lend permanence to the landscape.

Tender love and care could easily transform the circa-1885 barn.

The home's existing front cement step is jack-hammered away in preparation for landscape detailing.

Daylilies, though lovely, are replaced by hardy, climate-appropriate shrubs and flowering bushes.

The home's hydronic heating system terminates in the basement.

The rugged coastline bordering the Blog Cabin property provides a breathtaking view.

Space heaters dry reclaimed wood to prevent warping during the construction of DIY furnishings and decorative elements.

The home's original double front-door set, along with decorative door knobs and locking mechanisms, is reused in the master bedroom.

New cabinetry, flooring and island give the Blog Cabin kitchen a modern farmhouse makeover.

The home's brick fireplace, added during the 1980s, is replaced by a cast-iron stove.

A durable composite-board deck provides bench as well as built-in seating.

Early in the remodeling process, an existing fiberglass tub peeks through broken floorboards.

The 1,800-square-foot barn and two lofts (measuring 1,200 square feet total) replaced the property's original barn, which was attached to the home and used as a shed.

Blog Cabin 2012 show host Chris Grundy and House Crashers show host Josh Temple meticulously install floorboards in a herringbone pattern.

Blog Cabin originally sat on an 80-acre tract of land, gifted to the original owners in 1845.

The home's historic details are preserved where possible.

The home's foundation proved a medley of local granite, irregular fieldstones and poured concrete.

Online voters selected the mountain sage clapboards and heathered moss accent shingles.

The home's cramped warren of rooms is opened up.

An opaque glass light fixture, stored in the barn for safekeeping, will find a new home.

Trim panel lends a finishing touch to master bedroom wall paneling, crafted from old doors.

The barn serves as a staging and storage area for building materials.

The home's original barn was attached to the home when the larger red barn was constructed.

The Bath Crashers team pays a visit to a local metal artist's studio to craft a custom towel rack.

Worn wooden shakes are replaced by durable fiber cement siding.

Old window sash locks are among elements saved and donated to building reuse organizations.

Durable Noah Merrill windows in a 19th-century 6-over-1 pattern replace the home's original windows.

A new roof, clad in fiberglass asphalt shingles, stands up to Maine's harsh weather conditions.

A wall in the media room is clad in a mosaic of old barn wood.

A weather barrier prevents moisture infiltration.

Blog Cabin was built in 1884 to replace a log cabin that was located closer to the shoreline.

Old paint is scraped from a barn door, which is installed in the media room.

Old growth forest surrounds the property.

Carpeting and wallpaper are removed as part of the remodeling process.

The living room's light fixture finds a new home in the second-floor guest bedroom.

Blog Cabin's attached barn was dismantled and building materials reused where possible.

A switchback staircase replaces the home's original, dangerously steep double staircase.

The barn's paved driveway was added during the 1980s.

A path leads from the back of the red barn through forested acres to Peters Pond.

Mega Dens show host Anitra Mecadon works on a DIY project for the media room.

A new side entrance provides space for a casual-chic foyer and mud area.

Native, climate-appropriate landscape elements and boulders, sourced on the property, complete the renovation.