Foyer Pictures From Blog Cabin 2012

A bright, sunny entrance, made possible by the relocation of the home's staircase, offers space to stow outerwear and welcome guests.

Photo By: Frank Murray

Photo By: Frank Murray

Photo By: Frank Murray

Photo By: Frank Murray

Photo By: Jason Kisner

Photo By: Frank Murray

Photo By: Frank Murray

Photo By: Jason Kisner

Photo By: Frank Murray

Photo By: Jason Kisner

Photo By: Frank Murray

Photo By: Jason Kisner

Photo By: Frank Murray

Photo By: Frank Murray

Photo By: Jason Kisner

Photo By: Frank Murray

The home's original staircase, dangerously steep and in violation of code, was removed. A new switchback staircase makes room for an entry and storage space.

A 25-foot steel I-beam, installed to support the first floor, is clad in shiplap boards from Blog Cabin's original attached barn. Boards were planed and cleaned prior to installation, then covered in a coat of urethane.

A standalone closet, crafted from beadboard, features a closet door salvaged from the home's original pantry. The closet holds up to 10 coats and offers a storage shelf to stow hats, gloves and cold-weather accessories.

Visitors are greeted in the entry by gleaming Australian cypress wood floors. A special herringbone pattern, bordered by a double band of walnut floorboards, was selected by online voters.

Inspired by the design of front doors along Dutch Neck Road in Waldoboro, the closet door is outfitted with a frosted-glass diamond-shaped window.

The switchback staircase nestles in the space carved out by the home's original double staircase. Although treads, risers and balusters are new, the home's banister remains in its original condition.

Decorative accessories, including a reclaimed wood-framed mirror, wire storage baskets and an antique coat hanger reclaimed from an upstairs bedroom closet, lend lived-in elegance.

Newel posts from the home's original staircase, set aside and earmarked for a floor lamp project, were reinstalled to maintain the home's charm and historic integrity.

Originally selected for the living room, a landscape painting purchased at Elmer's Barn in Coopers Mills, Maine, finds a home in the landing. "It could easily be a scene from the Blog Cabin property," says interior decorator Victoria Lesser.

Interior decorator Victoria Lesser insisted that newel posts be saved rather than repurposed. "There is a significance behind a newel post. You can't destroy the newel posts. They are too important," she says.

A primitive farm tool, sourced locally and most likely used to clear snow, finds new life as a key holder. A fresh coat of chalkboard paint and hooks repurposed from an upstairs closet complete the design of this rustic-chic accessory.

The open foyer leads to the master suite, separated from the open first floor by vintage double doors — Blog Cabin's original double entry door set.

Pine table legs, purchased at a local antiques market, were cut down to size to form the base of foyer benches. Plywood and trim form handcrafted seats.

A custom message center, crafted from plywood, cork and trim, nestles inside a niche underneath the switchback staircase. Storage cabinets beneath the center feature hinges and knobs repurposed from old kitchen cabinetry.

Message-center panels are mounted on a piano hinge so the center can be removed to access a four-zone music system.

"I really love how all the rooms at Blog Cabin stuck to style and materials indigenous to the Coastal Maine region," says House Crashers show host Josh Temple. "It is really a perfect balance with a classic old world style and new world amenities."