Deck Pictures From Blog Cabin 2012

The removal of the home's brick chimney made way for a curved and illuminated back deck, accessible from both the living room and the master suite.

Photo By: Frank Murray

Photo By: Jason Kisner

Photo By: Jason Kisner

Photo By: Jason Kisner

Photo By: Jason Kisner

Photo By: Jason Kisner

Photo By: Jason Kisner

Photo By: Jason Kisner

Photo By: Jason Kisner

Photo By: Frank Murray

Photo By: Jason Kisner

Photo By: Jason Kisner

Photo By: Jason Kisner

Photo By: Jason Kisner

Photo By: Jason Kisner

Photo By: Jason Kisner

Photo By: Jason Kisner

Photo By: Frank Murray

A durable composite board deck, which replaces the home's existing wood deck, runs the length of the exterior, extending the home's living space.

A fresh layer of sod and thoughtfully designed landscape beds lend permanence to the sloped backyard.

The curved design of the deck, the two-tone finish (spiced rum and Winchester gray) and built-in seating were three features selected by Blog Cabin's online voters.

Classic outdoor seating, constructed of durable, recycled plastic lumber, cozies up under a button-tilt umbrella with Sunbrella-fabric canopy and cast-iron base.

A crank handle allows for easy positioning of the umbrella canopy. All-weather cushions in a classic neutral elevate the casual, Adirondack-style design.

A stainless steel gas grill forms a grilling station in the master suite area of the back deck. Two adjustable and stackable chaises offer a spot to perch and sunbathe, while keeping a close eye on food.

Native lupine and peonies soften hardscapes, formed with site-sourced boulders.

Open meadowland slopes gracefully to a private beach. Former owners hired a local farmer to cut, bale and sell hay in exchange for land management.

LED riser lights provide just the right amount of illumination as daylight turns to dusk.

Manufactured by the Maine Float Rope Company, doormats are handwoven from recycled lobster trap float-rope that would otherwise entangle and harm whales. The organization donates a percentage of profits to organizations and projects that help aid the environment and support Maine lobstermen.

"The curved benches give the deck a very custom look and the composite material used to build the deck will withstand any kind of weather Maine throws at it (not to mention withstanding any kind of celebratory gatherings the winner will throw at it)," says Yard Crashers show host Matt Blashaw.

A series of composite windows with transoms maintains the historic charm of the home, while improving energy efficiency.

Blog Cabin 2012 nestles on 21 acres of meadowland. DIY Network donated 30 of the property's original 51 acres to the Medomak Valley Land Trust (MVLT) in Waldoboro, Maine.

To prevent flooding of interiors, Blog Cabin, like most homes of the era, was built on high ground. The backyard slopes 1 1/2 feet from the prominence on which the home sits; terracing helps to flatten the grade.

A four-zone, four-source whole-house music system pipes music into the outdoor deck area, as well as the living room, kitchen and master suite.

A stone pathway, fashioned from locally quarried ledgestone, connects the back deck to the patio area.

A subtle nod to Blog Cabin's history, a vintage watering can, purchased at Nobleboro Antique Exchange, stands as garden sculpture.

In the evening, the glow of interior lights illuminates the back deck, where multiple seating options accommodate large gatherings.

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