Landing Pictures From Blog Cabin 2011

Farmhouse architecture is the focus of this second-floor space, which leads to front and back balconies and the home’s master suite and guest rooms.

Photo By: Frank Murray

Photo By: Frank Murray

Photo By: Frank Murray

Photo By: Jason Kisner

Photo By: Frank Murray

Photo By: Jason Kisner

Photo By: Jason Kisner

Photo By: Jason Kisner

Photo By: Jason Kisner

Photo By: Jason Kisner

A refurbished staircase with original treads and new balusters chosen by online voters leads to the second-floor landing, a sun-filled space that overlooks both front and back yards.

Among the curated collection of furnishings, a vintage jewelry chest provides storage and a place to prop a glass of lemonade or sunglasses as one moves from interior to exterior spaces.

A distressed cabinet, originally fitted with a clear glass door, becomes a hall mirror and provides additional storage space. A weathered canoe paddle continues the home’s subtle nautical theme.

“There’s a psychology behind everything,” says designer Victoria Lesser, who made furniture placement decisions based on natural traffic flow.

The four-foot rear extension accommodates a 14-foot second-floor balcony that overlooks the patio and fire pit. High-endurance building materials, including vinyl railings and Trex decking, will stand up to coastal weather conditions and pests.

Interior design elements, many reclaimed from antique and thrift shops throughout the mid-Atlantic, feel right at home in the circa-1905 farmhouse.

A storage dresser, positioned atop a cross-leg table locally crafted from reclaimed materials, begs examination. The finely crafted furniture piece appears as if it is original to the home.

A clue as to what room lies beyond, a vintage child’s chair, washed in a mustard paint glaze, finds a home at the far end of the hall.

Ornamentation comes in the form of a Chippendale-style mirror that helps to brighten the space.

A portrait by Roanoke artist Mary Buck Bryant graces the wall. The artist, who specializes in pottery and liquid watercolors, captures a springtime scene familiar to residents of Mathews County.

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