Front Porch Pictures From Blog Cabin 2010

With tapered Arts-and-Crafts-style columns and durable decking, the front porch provides the perfect perch to relax and enjoy the country landscape.

Photo By: Jackson Riley Parker

Photo By: Jackson Riley Parker

Photo By: Jackson Riley Parker

Photo By: Jackson Riley Parker

Photo By: Jackson Riley Parker

Photo By: Jackson Riley Parker

Photo By: Jackson Riley Parker

Photo By: Jackson Riley Parker

Photo By: Jackson Riley Parker

The front porch, constructed of pressure-treated lumber topped with durable Trex decking, features a beadboard ceiling with recessed lighting and cultured stone-faced pillars, a post style chosen by online voters.

Cedar shake, which will weather naturally over time, lends rusticity to the front porch design. The shingle style was selected by online voters.

A nine-light, cross-buck-style door allows natural light to stream into the front entry and dining area of the home. The door style, a People's Choice favorite, was chosen over six-light and four-light, two-paneled door designs.

Tapered Arts-and-Crafts columns feature stone-faced bases topped with bluestone caps. The traditional porch railing leads to a reclaimed stone pathway.

A tapestry of textures punctuates the front porch design. A Trex-topped staircase, flanked by potted black-eyed Susans, leads to the home's cozy entrance.

Landscape beds that flank the walkway are planted with disease-resistant Knockout roses, which add a punch of color, and Kousa dogwood, a disease-resistant varietal that produces white bracts in the spring.

Positioned approximately 10 feet from the front porch staircase, pillars constructed by the Desperate Landscapes crew are faced with ledgestone and capped with bluestone. Copper and frosted-glass light fixtures brighten the walkway during the evening hours.

Green and gorgeous, a bluestone pathway, installed by the Desperate Landscapes crew, makes use of materials reclaimed from the side yard.

Two hundred shrubs and trees, chosen for both color and resistance to disease and drought, were planted in the front yard's landscape beds, protected by layers of natural cedar mulch.

Knockout roses that edge the walkway will develop a profusion of 2-inch blooms through the first frost. The shrub, which grows to a height of 3 to 5 feet, is resistant to blackspot and powdery mildew.

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