Treehouse Pictures From Blog Cabin 2009

Photo By: Jeffery Romaniuk

Photo By: Jeffery Romaniuk

Photo By: Jeffery Romaniuk

Photo By: Jeffery Romaniuk

Photo By: Jeffery Romaniuk

Photo By: Jeffery Romaniuk

Photo By: Jeffery Romaniuk

Photo By: Jeffery Romaniuk

Photo By: Jeffery Romaniuk

Photo By: Jeffery Romaniuk

Photo By: Jeffery Romaniuk

Create a cabin in the trees in several easy steps. First, determine the trees that will form the perimeter of the house. Then assemble the deck, frame and gable roof. Customize the look with decorative railing, a truss and a ladder.

The exterior of the treehouse is painted in a color palette and features roofing material identical to that of Blog Cabin.

The treehouse design begins with sturdy trees, which project through the roof of the structure, with 2" by 8" rafters connecting the trees and serving as a base on which the deck is built.

To construct the treehouse roof, the gable ends of the roof were framed out before a ridge beam was set in place. Rafters were attached to the beam and covered with pressure-treated material and shingles.

The treehouse's decorative window frames were fashioned from 1" by 4" cedar planks.

The interior of the treehouse is painted in subtle green shades. The floor is constructed of pressure-treated ¾” plywood.

This treehouse's decorative features include a gable-end truss constructed from untreated timber.

The treehouse railing was customized to fit around trees growing up through the structure.

The custom swing, crafted by licensed contractor Matt Blashaw, features a walnut seat, cedar backing and rope ties secured to the seat with bolin knots. The swing is attached to eye bolts screwed into treehouse joists.

The ladder, which DiResta calls the “crowning jewel” of the treehouse, features maple tree sides and walnut rungs and, for a climber’s safety, is affixed to the edge of the treehouse.

A ground-floor view of the treehouse showcases the underside of the deck and perimeter.